fisher v university of texas

It is tempting to pit racial/ethnic and socioeconomic diversity as competing goals. But there is no evidence that pursuing one kind of diversity keeps colleges from achieving the other.
With a similar case against Harvard University currently winding its way through the federal courts, the answer may not be
A divided court found that UT Austin's consideration of race in college admissions is constitutional.
Neurodiversity is a concept that stresses the need to recognize neurological differences like Dyslexia, Attention Deficit
As a senior in college, I can't say I'm the most qualified person to make a decision on whether race should play a factor in college admissions. However, based on my research and class discussions this semester, it is evident something needs to be changed throughout the country and more specifically here at the University of Delaware.
Meet Abigail Fisher, the onetime University of Texas applicant who took her case to the Supreme Court.
There's always been this rhetoric that people of color who are accepted into these schools are accepted because of their skin color due to Affirmative Action.
It is clear that race may be considered in police profiling, stop and frisk practices, housing discrimination, bias crimes, locating pollution-emitting municipal facilities, but we are miraculously color blind when considering opportunity.
Justice Scalia should know better; if nothing other than judicial temperament could guide him, he should know that a wise judge must think twice before opening his mouth to say something really stupid and highly prejudicial in front of the parties arguing their case before him.
How can we even talk about reducing (and slowly eliminating) affirmative action when such obvious challenges are present at our universities and colleges, and in other areas of society? We must not turn back the clock.
Education is the primary mechanism for upward mobility in the United States and practices to promote greater access and equity must be enshrined in policy that is protected by law.
A lack of access and diversity at higher education institutions threatens the economic future of the country at large and predominately minority communities in particular because most of the new jobs and careers will require post-secondary education.
The plaintiffs and their supporters would have you believe that racial discrimination and hatred are things of the past. They regard affirmative action as "reverse racism," as though such a thing can possibly exist. Racism requires power and privilege, attributes in short supply in communities of color.
We should all be paying close attention to the Fisher case, not just because of what it means for future of diversity at the University of Texas, but because of the potential impact it could have on the ability of colleges and universities across the country to welcome student bodies that reflect the full diversity of America.
When it comes to affirmative action, we remain stuck on simple. This is part of a national trend where we keep debating seemingly straightforward, and long-resolved, questions and therefore are unable to tackle the harder questions that could bring us closer to true equality.
There is little reason to believe that the widely held claim that black and Latino students enter selective universities as comparatively inferior students will not cease to rear its ugly head. It is a pervasive stereotype that minority students must face from matriculation to graduation.