Flannery O'Connor

These names were only given to 10 newborns last year.
We still have Catholic novelists and Catholic novels, but curiously, mainstream publishers are hesitant to use the label.
A 1940s study found four different types of blocked writers: those who were anxious, those who took their anger out on others, those who were apathetic, and those who were hostile and disappointed.
I've been thinking a lot about meanness lately. I'm sure it's the Trump-Cruz-Rubio fiasco that's fueling my meditations. But the whole thing has gotten me thinking more generally about the many flavors of meanness, and about when, why and how people decide to be mean to each other.
A few months back, I was sent a press link of Weyes Blood's newest EP Cardamom Times. As a member of the press I get sent lots of stuff to listen to and try to make time to get around to all of it.
Margaret Eby's new book, South Toward Home: Travels in Southern Literature, is part history, part criticism, part travelogue, and part memoir.
Flannery O'Connor damned the novel with pretty faint praise when it came out: "I think for a child's book it does all right." That seems unduly harsh (and unfair to YA literature). What works best for me as an adult reader is the slow accretion of local color, the barbed social comedy, and the graceful prose.
Ace Atkins is well-known to thriller-lovers everywhere. He was a Pulitzer Prize nominated journalist, has written standalone novels, and is known for his Nick Travers and Quinn Colson series.
The premise here is we women know precisely what traits we like in men, even if men are the last ones to figure this out. Hint: there are actually ten things we love, not just seven.
Watch Me Go concerns Douglas "Deesh" Sharp, who has managed to stay on the right side of the law by hauling junk for cash. But after he and two friends dispose of a sealed oil drum, Deesh finds himself betrayed, and running from the police.
The induction ceremony included a traditional Choral Evensong featuring excerpts from O'Connor's writing and reflections
It shouldn't come as a huge surprise that the inspired daughter of a profound poet likes to write. Any time, anyplace. Words, thoughts, phrases will get scribbled down on notepads, Post-its or, if it's during a night out on the town, even cocktail napkins.
These Georgia peaches have contributed to the culture and economy of their state and the U.S. I have profiled two amazing Georgia women in recent blogs: Coretta Scott King and Juliette Gordon Low, both of whom have been inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame. Of course, there are many other accomplished Georgia women. Let's learn about a few.
Women rarely admit our ambitions out loud not only because we fear failure -- a fear we share with our male counterparts -- but because wanting to succeed might make us seem less feminine. That's the tricky part.
Up-and-coming Knoxville, Tennessee, is striving mightily to prove that great art doesn't grow only out of provincial urban Meccas -- and it's about to unveil the jewel that will crown that assertion.
While virtue may evoke admiration, evil excites. The Underwoods are like power porn. They flesh out our fantasies. They are a trip into the forbidden in us all.
Jerry is one of those rare writers who goes between Hollywood screenplays and novels. He writes dark subversive stories and he somehow continues to get away with it.
God can renew and refurbish our spirits, our hearts, our drive, our attitudes. God can give us a positive, willing, and steadfast spirit to live and learn from mistakes and to change direction. Yes, God can.
What if reading Elmore Leonard, F. Scott Fitzgerald or any great author could help you find a job?Sounds crazy. Or at best a gimmick. Until you start thinking about what really helps people find jobs.