Flannery O'Connor

These names were only given to 10 newborns last year.
We still have Catholic novelists and Catholic novels, but curiously, mainstream publishers are hesitant to use the label.
A 1940s study found four different types of blocked writers: those who were anxious, those who took their anger out on others, those who were apathetic, and those who were hostile and disappointed.
I've been thinking a lot about meanness lately. I'm sure it's the Trump-Cruz-Rubio fiasco that's fueling my meditations. But the whole thing has gotten me thinking more generally about the many flavors of meanness, and about when, why and how people decide to be mean to each other.
A few months back, I was sent a press link of Weyes Blood's newest EP Cardamom Times. As a member of the press I get sent lots of stuff to listen to and try to make time to get around to all of it.
Margaret Eby's new book, South Toward Home: Travels in Southern Literature, is part history, part criticism, part travelogue, and part memoir.
Flannery O'Connor damned the novel with pretty faint praise when it came out: "I think for a child's book it does all right." That seems unduly harsh (and unfair to YA literature). What works best for me as an adult reader is the slow accretion of local color, the barbed social comedy, and the graceful prose.
Ace Atkins is well-known to thriller-lovers everywhere. He was a Pulitzer Prize nominated journalist, has written standalone novels, and is known for his Nick Travers and Quinn Colson series.
The premise here is we women know precisely what traits we like in men, even if men are the last ones to figure this out. Hint: there are actually ten things we love, not just seven.
Watch Me Go concerns Douglas "Deesh" Sharp, who has managed to stay on the right side of the law by hauling junk for cash. But after he and two friends dispose of a sealed oil drum, Deesh finds himself betrayed, and running from the police.