flatiron-school

As good ole fashioned jobs dry up faster than plants in the summer, there's a gold rush to get the 21st century skills you need to marketable. That message has not been lost on a crop of new "how to learn programming in a hurry" schools.
The value, and expense of education is a complex subject -- a subject which, particularly in our current economic climate, has been repeatedly addressed by people with more experience in, and knowledge of, higher education.
Adam Milligan wrote a post yesterday called "The Problem with Hacker Schools." In it, he questions the value of programs like Flatiron School, of which I'm the founder and dean.
The absence of clear alternatives to traditional four-year programs has generated a lot of confusion about what it takes to work effectively in software.