flexible schedule

Think about the times you considered calling in sick even though you weren't because you were too tired or stressed. Flexible
Very recently I was introduced to a church-word I had never heard before. The new word, now part of my professional lexicon, is "Creasters." Like a celebrity mash-up, it is a morphing of two words: "Christmas," and "Easter."
Authentic workers are more productive workers.
The flexibility it provides to moms interested in a career change cannot be underestimated. The days of being locked into a job because of employer health benefits may finally be over.
Most of my friends know they will get paid every other Friday, and they know they have X number of sick days. It's a routine, it's a way of life -- but it's not mine. In fact, my freelance life (and lack of a steady paycheck) is the antithesis of all they know and hold dear.
I was thrilled to be working from home: I bought a new desk, reveled in the short commute from my bedroom to my home office, and enjoyed not having to get dressed up one day a week. After four months in my new job, though, I stopped working from home.
If we want to take advantage of the countless flexible ways we can fit work and life together in order to be our best, on and off the job, then we can't be derailed by a rigid definition of success.
As a "Nightline" producer, I traveled all over the world covering interesting stories, leaving unused theater tickets and broken dates behind. There was always tomorrow.
While these Working Mother's Day "gifts" may take effort, I'm no longer willing to wait for them. I do not want to have wish these gifts for my daughter; I want them now.
Six years ago, my husband (then boyfriend) and I set out to find a way to develop our careers while traveling the world -- and without breaking the bank.