flibanserin

It's exciting for women who have struggled with hypoactive sexual disorder to be recognized and have a medication alternative. Not only is it a viable option for this disruptive sexual dysfunction, but the FDA is showing support in the challenges with female sexual health.
We often joke about low libido, but for many women HSDD is a serious condition. It is up to you and your healthcare professional to determine which protocol is best for your personal health needs.
The controversy about flibanserin is in fact magnificent, and frankly, the entire point. We must talk openly about sexuality and sexual concerns to improve them, personally for one woman at a time, but also uniformly to embrace female sexuality as a vastly larger societal allowance.
Each of us should be allowed to decide whether or not to accept the agency's opinions. Those who want to categorically trust the government would still be able do so. But those who want to rely on other sources would be given the freedom to choose.
From a Times editorial, "'Little Pink Pill' for Women Comes With Risks," (NYT, 8/21/15), "The most serious side effects include severely low blood pressure and loss of consciousness."
Since August 18, headlines have proclaimed the news about the approval of the so-called "female Viagra," Addyi™ . The approval sparked enthusiastic responses from advocates and opponents, which will no doubt continue.
During the 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, approximately 2,400 premenopausal women with HSDD
Both drugs treat sexual issues, but that's where the similarities end.
Next week, however, we are on track to make the kind of progress in gender equity that usually comes once in a generation. This will be a step forward that makes the battles that came before worth it and, on a personal note, serves as a soothing salve to my chronic outrage.
Over a month ago, I had the chance to attend hearings at the FDA on a drug being considered for approval for female sexual health. Even as the weeks pass, the experience remains fresh in my mind and catalyzes lots of conversations (with folks who like to discuss this sort of thing).
Sex is a basic human right -- a human right. Not a man right. Women want to have sex and, more than that, they want to enjoy it.
Is this new drug flianserin really the "female Viagra," or is it just a drug that empowers women to talk about gender discrimination?
What I've learned from my 40-year career as a women's rights champion is simple: progress, at its foundation -- at its very core -- is about making life better for people. And just last week, an FDA panel made big progress for millions of women living with Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder.
The June 4 edition of the New York Times contained an article, "Viagra for women is backed by an FDA panel." It was written
Flibanserin, the so-called "female Viagra" which aims to treat a lack of sexual desire among women, is on its way to getting
Creating a “female version of Viagra” is way harder than it might seem. Viagra works on the arteries, causing physical shifts
So what is the rub, and why is it a big deal? From Sprout's perspective, and many other pharmaceutical companies and female health organizations, the FDA has shown a consistent disregard and blatant gender discrimination for women's health.
Even if not every woman who struggles with libido is willing to take a pill, it's hard to deny that the need for treatment