food crisis

“I knew things were bad down there but I didn’t know it was this bad.”
This summer, the World Atlas ranked Malawi as the poorest country in the world. Just last month, the Center for Strategic & International Studies reported that Malawi is facing its worst humanitarian crisis in its history as widespread maize harvest failures have created massive food shortages.
In Venezuela, the state has created hunger games and these games have morphed into war -- a war of the state against citizens and a war of citizens and against citizens.
Clearly, the world can't end extreme poverty without better tackling these challenges. Our work in 29 of the world's poorest
Once again Ethiopia's food crisis is topping the headline. As seasonal rain fails in Eastern and Southern parts of the country, famine is threatening millions of Ethiopians. The UN estimates over 10 million are in need of emergency food aid.
Yes, all humans hunger and get sick. But why does God not intervene and save hungry kids from dying? The Quran answers this question elegantly.
Now, with the quakes disrupting the wheat harvest and maize planting season, and with assets, infrastructure and markets destroyed, the challenge ahead is to provide immediate relief while staying the course for long-term improvements.
Mary Nyalipe Yoac has lived through five famines and four wars. Her brown eyes, now fading into a bluish grey with age, have witnessed more brutality and suffering than most can comprehend. Tragically, the last 10 months were no different, her community devoured by fighting and all that she owned destroyed or looted.
World Food Day is an important date for farming communities across the globe -- but not in South Sudan. Without its farmers, markets and transport infrastructure, this country remains perilously close to famine.
By the year 2100, there will be an estimated 11 billion people living on Earth. The Economist's video explains that while
Despite all these warning signs, it is tempting to think of unsustainability as somebody else's problem. Shortages of food and water are local problems... right? Wrong. In a global economy unsustainability, wherever it occurs, is everyone's problem sooner or later.
Shukri Sheikh Ali thought this year would be different. It was to be a time of rebuilding, of recovering, of returning home. Instead, she is starting over once again from scratch, her land thirsty for rain and her village emptied by conflict.
The five steps (freeze agriculture's footprint, grow more on existing farms, use resources more efficiently, shift diets, reduce waste) are all good technological fixes, none of which are terribly complicated. So if they are so great, why aren't we implementing them?
Until the food challenge is squarely met, prudence dictates that we should be expanding domestic and international support for voluntary family planning, and in the developing world we should be promoting smaller, healthier families by educating girls, empowering women, and eliminating child marriage.
There is nothing romantic about poverty and hunger. They are ugly. But what is even uglier is our need to blame the victims rather than to help heal their plight.
I want to talk about the role of women defending life, culture, and territories, opposing a model of death that grows stronger
  Consuelo and her neighbors live in homes made of blue tarps, surrounded by patches of corn and rows of African oil palms