food-culture

Next we close our eyes, break a piece and inhale deeply. This is the most important analysis. Are the aromas pineapple? Walnut? Hummus? Wet grass? Cloves? Leather? It can be any of those things based on age and cheese terroir.
My bordering-on-obsessive hatred of "foodie" is really about the culture it's perpetuating. That said, the word itself is infantile, idiotic, and meaningless, and makes me want to poke my eyes out with a larding needle. Can't people just say they love food?
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgWhatever innovation and evolution led to the English pub, French bistro, Italian caffe and Afghan kebab house, today every pub, bistro, caffe or kebab house is effectively a node on a cultural franchise, and will hew to a pretty rigorous expression of "pub" or "kebab house."
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgIt's true -- I'm a black man with a watermelon for a birthmark. In many countries and cultures around the world, this would be unremarkable. But in the United States, where watermelon is associated with historic African-American stereotypes, my birthmark takes on a more complex symbolism.
Fried ice cream, just like the General Tso's Chicken that Jennifer 8. Lee explores in her presentation, highlight the role of immigrants in facilitating the global circulation of culinary traditions, and in shaping the food of their host communities.
The truth is that America is in the middle of inventing a new food culture, and no one, not the foodies nor the food activists nor the Grocery Manufacturers Association of America, can predict how powerful a force for change it may be.
Winemaker Rudy Marchesi has crafted his life around a world devoted to food. He has carved out a communal "little five acre food oasis" he calls home.
The recent to-do about President Obama dining on dog meat when a child in Indonesia, as if he had been gobbling down Fido the neighbor's pet, struck me as unenlightened and ludicrous.
Is there a difference between baking with Oreos, Twinkies, industrial marshmallows and other bagged candy as primary foodstuffs and flour, sugar, butter, cream, eggs and baking chocolate?
A few years ago, I decided to celebrate a Jewish friend's birthday by cooking a special meal: the whole menu was composed of Italian Jewish recipes.
You end up mesmerized by the sushi preparation, the supple movements that assemble it almost magically, the glistening textures of eels, shrimp, and fat tuna, the vapors of the kitchen, the whiffs of smoke from the burning hay that lightly grills the fish.
We've all been there. You're hungry, maybe you're ordering delivery, or maybe you're going to that place down the street. You place your order. Then, all of a sudden, there's something standing between you and satisfaction... a language barrier.
By exploring food history, we realize that many elements of our everyday life that we consider connected to current events were already a source of preoccupation for earlier generations.
Cooking is something we do to create a richer, more abundant life without needing to spend a lot of money, impress anyone, or do violence to animals. Does that sound elitist to you?
The longer I live in Europe, the more I am aware that whereas Americans view food and cooking as a lifestyle choice, food and cooking in Europe is just a way of life.
Myers is a vegan, and he brings his biases to the table, turning the article into a subtle, clandestine polemic designed to stress the carnivorous aspect of foodie culture as degeneracy. A cold person indeed.
What's in your pantry has become a form of self-expression much like a fabulous pair of Christian Louboutins. Just as the label "fashionista" evokes an entire lifestyle, so, too, does the term "foodie."