Food for Peace

The president might see zeroed-out funding for foreign food aid as "putting America first," but members of Congress clearly disagree.
The United States and Russia must use their influence in Syria’s civil war to end humanitarian blockades. That is a crucial
The United Nations declared famine Monday in parts of South Sudan, where 100,000 people are facing starvation. It could get
The World Food Programme has the difficult task of feeding civilians displaced by war and drought. (photo UNMIS/Issac Gideon
The coming primaries will decide who the Republicans will nominate for President. They would be wise to look to someone who can tackle issues of great national and international importance like hunger. For America usually goes with the candidate who shows leadership in feeding the hungry. John Kasich has.
Thousands of Syrians each day are making a dangerous journey to get away from the conflict in the Middle East. What should the international community do? Start welcoming them. That is exactly what President Dwight Eisenhower did when he launched Operation Safe Haven.
The size of the humanitarian crisis in Syria is so large that donations from Food for Peace and other countries needs to pick up dramatically. The situation is urgent.
There are now 12.9 million people in Yemen living in hunger-- almost half of the population. This number has risen dramatically since the outbreak of fighting between the Houthi rebels and the Saudi Arabia-backed coalition.
While a strategy for peace in Iraq is still being formed, we already know one ingredient. Food will help write the peace in Iraq. For there cannot be any peace or stability with people starving and malnourished. We cannot abandon Iraqis in this time of great distress.