food label

When an animal food product in your grocery store is proudly labeled "USDA Organic," you would think that means the animal had exposure to fresh air, sunshine, and significantly more space to move than on standard non-organic farms. But in reality, the "organic" label provides no clear requirements for either space or outdoor access for most animals.
A new study found that a Nutritional Value label helped consumers buy healthier foods.
The proposed label changes were up for public comment until the end of October, and the final decision will be out soon. If it passes, already motivated people will have a chance at making better-informed sugar choices.
This means that foods that are inherently gluten-free, like water, vegetables and fruits, can also be labeled as gluten-free
Is basing serving sizes on what people actually eat the right decision in light of current rates of obesity and chronic disease? Or will it only further confuse consumers on what is an appropriate serving size, adding to the education burden that already exists?
Grocery shoppers, prepare to be a lot smarter about what goes into your basket. And since what goes into your basket eventually goes into you and your family, this is truly great news for the health of our country.
It can be confusing and daunting at first, but familiarizing yourself with the nutrition content of the food you're putting into your body will help you really learn about different nutrients and encourage you to make better choices.
Nutrition labels should be clear, honest, and informative -- and reading one shouldn't require the skills of an NSA code-breaker. But too often, companies try to trick people into buying foods that aren't as healthy as the labels pretend.
Overwhelmed by all those hard-to-pronounce words on the ingredient list? You're not alone. "The Nutrition Facts panel is
As the FDA and other government organizations continue to debate front of label systems, a new study suggests design and color deserve as much attention as the nutrition information itself if we are to really help consumers reach informed food choices.
The lack of a publicly-accessible database of labels is inhibiting the innovation in the area of healthy nutrition and marginalizes the benefits of using labels by the consumers.
For most, deciphering nutrition labels can be like reading hieroglyphics. It can be time-consuming and thankless. I'm committed to providing my readers as much accurate nutrition information as possible.
After overindulging during the holidays, many of us have resolved to eat a healthier diet in the new year. But doing so means choosing the right foods, and too often misleading food labels prompt us to purchase items that we think are good for us but really aren't.