food supply

Honeybees pollinate a long list of foods that we eat in a daily basis. Here's what bee experts say about their chances of surviving the Asian giant hornet.
Aquaponics is helping farmers figure out how to feed a world population expected to reach nearly 10 billion by 2050.
Can a leaf taste sunlight? I have never seen the question posed before, let alone answered, by someone with the botanical
It is also a sign of a huge opportunity—the opportunity to create a solution that is truly win-win-win. For the second conversation
When we think of climate change, we tend to picture rising sea levels, higher temperatures, expanding deserts, more violent storms, melting ice caps. But we should also think of wasted fields and hungry people, because climate change poses a tremendous threat to our food supply for all countries.
Undercover video recorded by an animal rights activist at one of the largest U.S. pork producers appears to show pigs being beaten and dragged across the slaughterhouse floor as workers cheer and throw blood-soaked towels at one another.
Pigs that appear covered with feces and sores are headed for processing in the video at one of the largest U.S. pork producers.
This we can change. In drought-plagued California, for example, meat and dairy account for almost half of the state's entire
At a time when science often seems to be on the defensive - from the safety of vaccines and genetically modified organisms to the very existence of evolution and climate change - I have found a hopeful sign. On Mars.
Social equity in the food supply chain was a strong thread running through the annual Sustainable Agriculture & Food Systems Funders forum this June in Denver.
The International Center for Tropical Agriculture is a Colombia-based nonprofit research and development organization devoted
The ultimate deal was far from perfect, but it reflects the growing power of the food movement and it just might hint at the beginnings of a new direction for American agriculture.
On a planet where one in eight people is chronically hungry, it's an almost unimaginable irony: every year, one-third of the world's food supply is wasted.
When's the last time you've loved a piece of fruit? I mean, really, truly loved? Who wants to eat a dry, white-centered strawberry? And there's no way our kids are eating their fruits and vegetables if they don't taste great. They'll choose artificially sweetened treats over the sad little strawberry every time.
Imagine if we -- the food customers -- rallied around a higher standard to serve our collective satisfaction. Could we really stand up to Big Food? Would we be biting off more than we could hope to chew and swallow, or might we really change the food supply?