Food writing

The last New York Times article he wrote, entitled "The Global Gourmet," was published posthumously on October 5, 2006. The
The Book Doctors first met Judith Fertig when she won our Kansas City Pitchapalooza (think American Idol for Books). She was commanding without being overbearing, powerful but warm, a total pro.
How do we create a more fully human and equitable world though just, thoughtful, and pleasurable practices in growing, preparing and consuming what we eat?
Bad reviews display all the linguistic symptoms of minor trauma.
If you aren't familiar with these food blogs yet, stop what you're doing and get acquainted.
All of us are writing about food because we can't ever stop thinking about it, and don't we actually just want to be making it all the time?
And so it went in issue after issue of many of America's bestselling magazines through the 1940s and '50s. Rosie the Riveter may have found her way to the factory floor during World War II, but you'd never know it by looking at these publications. But in the midst of all this, a different voice was born: Gourmet.
My 13-year old and I were both home sick. He wasn't so sick he couldn't watch TV and talk about doing his homework, and I wasn't so sick, I couldn't check my email, but we were both stuffed-up and lethargic, or as my SAT-studying-17-year old might say, overcome with lassitude.
In an ever-growing number of Food Studies classes, college undergraduates are reading blogs like Smitten Kitchen, Orangette, Pinch My Salt, and The Pioneer Woman Cooks with the keen eyes of anthropologists studying the customs of an unfamiliar land.
In case you missed these pieces earlier this year, now is your time to catch up!
Behold, 5 delicious things that warmed my soul and filled my tummy.
1971, the year when Alice Waters opened Chez Panisse in Berkeley, CA, is often cited as a turning point for American cuisine.
Sure, waiting's the worst, especially for an impatient youngest child as myself, but when it pays off, there's nothing like it.
These four tastes are quality, and show that in lieu of such restaurant-ing, I've been sandwiching home cooking in between my lengthy work sessions. Behold, my hopefully anomalous Top Four Tastes...
Before I sat down to write about John Currence's new cookbook -- Pickles, Pigs & Whiskey -- I surveyed my brown liquor shelf and found just the right courage: a bottle of Willett Rye with one good pump left in it.
Living in such a culinarily vibrant city allows me the opportunity to enjoy any food on a whim; from classic dishes like summer rolls or ham and cheese crepes to new and exciting ones like tomato tarte Tatin, a healthful naan sandwich and a finger-sized anchovy hors d'oeuvre.
It's almost sort of close to feeling like Fall, so naturally I'm chowing down on animal products of all kinds, whether in soup, sandwich or shell form.
I hope you've noticed I've been on hiatus. After fantastic fresh seafood and too much rosé on vacation, I've returned ready to explore the new 'hoods goods.