forced arbitration

A very fancy protester lurked behind former Equifax CEO Richard Smith during his hearing before the Senate Banking Committee.
In 1995, a part-time actuary for the Alabama Insurance Department achieved what the insurance industry had been trying to accomplish in state legislatures nationwide for years.
The Devil is reputed by some to have had all the best tunes. But those claiming to be on the side of the angels can often
Banks and payday lenders have had a good deal going for a while: They could break the law, trick their customers in illegal ways, and not have to face any consumer lawsuits.
Many people know that the U.S. Chamber is the number one lobbying force in the nation. But you might not know that ILR has
Anyone who believes that corporations should not be given the power to impose forced arbitration--which is rigged in their favor and against individuals--should urge their Members of Congress to support and pass the AFA.
If you've ever opened a credit card, rented a car or engaged in any number of other routine interactions with big corporations, you've probably had to sign away your right to go to court or band together in a class action with other customers.
The ability of large corporations and hugely wealthy people to control the mechanisms of American government has been established by the narrowest of margins. One vote can determine if they can have it all. Now you know why Charles Koch is shopping for a president.
For those who haven't read the series, let me summarize: If you have a credit card, bank account, purchased anything over the internet, rented a car, placed a loved one in a nursing home or even gotten a new job lately, it is likely that you have unknowingly agreed to have any dispute with the company resolved in a private, biased, corporate-controlled arbitration system.
We commend the CFPB for moving to prohibit class-action bans. But the agency should go further and ban forced arbitration entirely wherever it has the power to do so.
If nursing homes are permitted to continue opting out of the civil justice system, we can expect to see lower levels of care, and higher numbers of preventable injuries and deaths.
In today's regulations, the Department of Labor puts an end to these unfair Supreme Court decisions, including forced arbitration for millions of employees of federal contractors. It's a huge step towards strengthening the civil rights laws.
Buried in the fine print of those "terms and conditions of use" is a forced arbitration clause. That means that if you have a dispute with Spotify, you have to take your case to a decision maker at a firm they choose -- not a judge or jury. In addition, if Spotify violates the rights of thousands, even millions, of its listeners, they can't band together to seek justice.
Our film Lost in the Fine Print shows what happens when consumers and employees are prevented from standing up for their rights in court and instead forced to go before an arbitrator hired by the very company that wronged them. Much of the time, forced arbitration clauses mean those disputes never go anywhere at all. Now there is a new mass of additional evidence.
Preliminary results from a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) study show how widespread are forced arbitration terms
Facing off against a powerful company in arbitration is like playing a baseball game in which the other team hires and fires the umpires. So it's no wonder that, in consumer disputes, one study found that arbitrators rule for companies over consumers 94 percent of the time.