fossil fuel

The Federal Reserve's bond-buying program is yet another way the government props up an industry that experts say is in decline.
A bill intended to have a chilling effect threatens seven years in prison for protesters and up to $100,000 in fines for groups supporting them.
As chaos grips the nation, the agency is changing water permitting rules to make it harder for states to block construction of fossil fuel pipelines.
The legislation could inflict harsh new punishments on Black protesters opposing a massive complex of plastics plants on what are likely slave burial grounds.
In March, Kentucky, South Dakota and West Virginia passed laws restricting pipeline protests. Alabama is poised to become the fourth.
The 12-member energy panel includes eight fossil fuel executives who have donated $4.2 million to Republican candidates and PACs since June 2016.
Lawmakers in the capital of capital are considering backing the campaign targeting banks, asset managers and insurers.
Amid a global pandemic, members of Congress look to throw a lifeline to the industry that bankrolled their campaigns.
The delayed COVID-19 response was met with swift condemnation. But outrage about the decades-long delay on climate change continues to be waved away as alarmism.
Proponents hope the simple stickers will make consumers question their own use of fossil fuels.