fossil fuel industry

Over the past two weeks, Kentucky, South Dakota and West Virginia approved new laws meant to discourage Dakota Access-style protests. More are on the way.
Last week, the AFL-CIO put out a statement from its president, Richard Trumka, under the headline "Dakota Access Pipeline Provides High-Quality Jobs."
Lawmakers are calling out companies they say engaged in a "sophisticated and deceitful campaign" to mislead the public.
In the light of the tight race in Wisconsin, this might just nudge some folks off the fence who had been playing it safe up until now and going with Hillary.
The next time an American voter asks Bernie Sanders what he means by "socialism," this is what I would whisper in his ear...
Even as the global warming crisis makes it clear that coal, natural gas, and oil are yesterday's energy, the momentum of two centuries of fossil fuel development means new projects keep emerging in a zombie-like fashion. And it's not just pipelines, not by a long shot.
Climate change denial isn't actually about the science. It's about opposition to regulation. It is about science-denying front groups, industry shills, bought-and-sold politicians, and other bad faith actors who continue to provide cover for corporate polluters like ExxonMobil by fooling the public.
The "end of coal" is no longer an activist pipe dream. It's a reality that's gaining growing acceptance from High Street to Wall Street as investors divest billions of dollars from this dirtiest of fossil fuels.
Fossil fuel companies may be a ripe target for a civil lawsuit under RICO as well, Whitehouse wrote. The industry coordinates
That Soon has taken funding from fossil fuel interests is not news; his funding from Exxon, the American Petroleum Institute