fossil fuel subsidies

The planet is warming at an unprecedented pace not experienced in the past 1000 years. That's according to NASA. That means that it is "very unlikely" that global warming will stay within the 1.5 degrees Celsius limit set by nations last December.
Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions have plateaued for the second year running - an extraordinary fact considering the global economy grew by more than 3% in the same period.
The next time an American voter asks Bernie Sanders what he means by "socialism," this is what I would whisper in his ear...
Stopping the investment of public tax dollars on fossil fuel subsidies is one of the first steps the U.S. needs to make in its green transition. When ExxonMobil is reporting $8.8 billion in quarterly profits, they can afford to take the hit.
This black hat/white hat dichotomy works best if you can reduce it to individuals as symbols. McKibben is obviously the white hat for the environment. In 2013, his status was confirmed with a Gandhi Peace Award.
With the threat of climate change and a host of other environmental challenges looming like a dark cloud, the 2016 election will be a time to hold candidates accountable on where they stand on these concerns -- and what they promise to deliver.
The presidential candidate favors letting the market decide.
We are giving companies our money while they are making record profits -- and paying nothing for the harm they do us with their pollution.
Last Tuesday, a company called Plains All American made a huge, oily mess along nine miles of California coast. A pipeline ruptured at around 10:45 am, and before the flow could be stopped about 105,000 gallons of crude had escaped--including about 21,000 into the Pacific Ocean.
The study of inequality has been going on forever. To give you an idea, the index used to measure how unequal the distribution of income is -- the "Gini Coefficient" -- was invented a century ago. So, why the sudden interest? Why worry now about something that has been the fodder of academics, politicians, and the media for so long?
The world needs to put the brakes on climate change. But any plan to tackle climate change can't sacrifice economic growth if we hope to end extreme poverty, reduce inequality, and ensure that poor people gain access to energy. We need to decouple growth from carbon emissions. Here are five ways the world can shift to a low-carbon growth path.
With strong leaders from both the public and private sector, we can slow climate change now by putting a price on carbon, eliminating fuel subsidies, and bring together bold, innovative country plans.
These giveaways could be called "corruption taxes." The definition of a "corruption tax" is a transfer of wealth to the very rich that no honest congressperson would support if campaigns were publicly financed.
The plunge in oil prices may be good for consumers and the global economy, but it could also hurt efforts to make our planet's energy system more sustainable. Policy makers from around the world can prevent this by taking advantage of cheaper oil to make meaningful changes in the way we price energy.
The costs to cities, coastlines and crops, as well as to the health and livelihoods of thousands, are mounting. China and the United States show the necessary determination to build a future based on low emissions through clean energy and livable cities because it makes sense for the environment and economies.
Our leaders aren't just dithering at the edges while the planet burns -- they're actively inviting the very companies that are causing this crisis to help fix it.
In order to successfully address climate change as a market failure, the oil and gas industry must internalize social and environmental costs involved with producing carbon dioxide -- not be given tax breaks and subsidies for continuing this economically inefficient and environmentally devastating behavior.