foundation for individual rights in education

Other speech codes comprise broad and vague restrictions on expression that practically anyone could be found guilty of violating
It started with a comment from a comedian about playing on college campuses.
An accused former University of Virginia student argues the Education Department illegally enacted additional regulations for schools.
This past year will be remembered as the year that freedom of speech (or the lack thereof) on U.S. campuses became international news.
What the blame-the-liberals campaign doesn't acknowledge, let alone insist, is that if students are petulant or frightened now and if deans and professors are pandering to them, it's not because of liberal ideology but mainly because the "retail-store university" regards them increasingly as customers.
In between, the report provides a principled statement of free expression rooted not just in the University of Chicago's
The problem is that, to a large degree, it seems that American intellectuals -- particularly those in academia -- have fallen out of love with freedom of speech.
The statement, which can be adapted to all universities -- not just the University of Chicago -- guarantees "all members of the University community the broadest possible latitude to speak, write, listen, challenge, and learn." Most importantly, it makes clear that "it is not the proper role of the University to attempt to shield individuals from ideas and opinions they find unwelcome, disagreeable, or even deeply offensive."
The article likens free speech advocates (like me, I assume) to "gun nuts," claims that campus speech codes have mostly been repealed (which is completely false), then bizarrely questions if people can believe in a diversity of belief. Those of us who are big fans of the concept of pluralism found the latter particularly mystifying.
I hope you'll read the whole article, which defies a quick summary, but there are three additional things I need to say about the piece.
As you can see, the collage included pictures of Zaccari, a parking deck, and the caption "S.A.V.E. - Zaccari Memorial Parking
Perhaps the greatest threat to academic freedom may be the Department of Education, which has promoted a definition of harassment so broad that cases like Laura Kipnis's are all but inevitable.
Blinn is a public college bound by the First Amendment, but when a student wanted to protest in favor of her Second Amendment rights she was told that she had to limit her free speech activities to this tiny zone.
If we want to realize social media's full promise of massive unprecedented global conversation conducted in real time, we should be teaching our students how to argue both thoughtfully and effectively.
Speech policing advocates forget that there is incredible value in knowing what people actually think, unfiltered. Believing you can conquer racism, bias and bigotry by rooting out microaggressions and enforcing self-censorship and uptightness is like taking Xanax for syphilis.