founders

Know what your cost of customer acquisition is and show investors how you can successfully grow you revenue regardless of raising capital. And don't use the term "conservatively" when estimating a value that is obviously and grossly overblown.
When I work with startups, I am invariably asked whether they "really need to bother with a business plan." Small businesses owners pose the same question.
At a recent Startup Weekend, one of the attendees asked me what I thought were the most important traits for an entrepreneur to posses to be successful.
We're not Ralph and Alice. We are married founders who spend a lot of time together. The banter is generally good and we work seven days. We are friends who respect each other and share the same values.
In a rare joint-column between "TechScape" and "BizScape," join us as we take a look at a business that satisfies both sectors in that it is a business that helps other start-ups AND a software technology which does that work for users.
Founders are just like us. It took hard work and heartache to get them where they are today and the journey for the rest of us will not be much different. Here are my top five favorite tips from founders.
This week, I speak with Kenny Leung, the CEO and co-founder of Premium Technology, a tech company providing Supply Chain Finance solutions to investment banks, and is based in New York City.
It's Winter Olympics time. I often flip past a channel that is showing the sport of curling, and curling is a beautiful analogy for startups -- or more pointedly, for the team that must surround a founder.
As an entrepreneur, sometimes it's hard to know what tools you need to be successful and what is superfluous. Especially for a start-up, hitting the ground running is essential. So I have put together my personal top five list of essential tools for any start-up, and how they have helped me in starting my own venture.
The fact that building a successful company is hard is not a revelation. Long days, time away from family and endless hours spent in airports are an accepted part of the job.
An entrepreneurial project requires you to live with it -- with uncertainty, naysayers, and the fog of creation -- for so long that you can only do it if it's so personal you would be irritated about it anyway.
Making the leap into starting your own business is a brave and bold move, and everyone's path is different. Here's my ultimate to-do list for new and aspiring founders.
When making the weighty decision to forgo a steady paycheck in favor of developing an unproven idea and building a company from scratch, passion, confidence, and optimism can blind founders to the challenges posed by these three factors.
While it's not clear yet whether the numbers of startups in Helsinki are sufficient to ignite, it feels like it's getting there (and given the risk-averse and paternal nature of Finland, that by itself is a miracle).