Francis Collins

When I started my career as a physician more than 30 years ago, I could only dream of the breakthroughs I’d come to witness
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I do not think President-elect Donald Trump has his mind completely made up on the subject of stem cell research. Certainly I cannot find any quotes from him opposing the research.
I've learned over the years of scouring arguments in the philosophy of religion that no proof for or against God is decisive, though, of course, some are better than others. Their best service is to offer plausibility to faith.
I used to hate this expression: "We engage people with arguments, not arguments in abstraction." I hated that phrase because I believed that the truth of an argument ought to be enough to convince us.
Whenever I mention that I specialize in religion and science, one of the first questions is "Are you a scientist?" Well, actually, I'm not. And there's a reason. I'm a Christian -- as well as a pastor and theologian specializing in this field -- who has found that scientific insights enhance, challenge, and strengthen my faith
The fine-tuning argument does not prove that God as the Designer of the universe exists if proof means a knock-down, drag-out, deductive proof, the conclusions of which cannot reasonably be denied. It does, nonetheless, offer evidences of God's design.
As the immensely influential early Christian thinker Augustine commented: "Let every good and true Christian understand that wherever truth may be found it belongs to the Master." I wish I had said that. I also wish that any believer would nod in agreement.
Science is in constant flux. New discoveries are made. New insights arise. New paradigms overturn previous ways of thinking. So if we base our religious outlook on scientific findings, what will happen to our theology when the science changes?
Despicable. That's the only word for it. I refer to the recent official email "Responding to the Ebola Crisis" of October 17 from my congressional representative, Bob Goodlatte, of Virginia's 6th District.
At this moment there is no Ebola epidemic in the United States. But some have tried -- quite intentionally -- to create an epidemic of fear and panic for their own political gain. That is irresponsible and reprehensible.
WASHINGTON -- A top official at the National Institutes of Health disagreed on Sunday with the notion that an Ebola vaccine
Adams offered another reason why the work came up empty: Money. “In 2008, of course, all that funding disappeared. So we
What a different world it would be for people whose lives have been upended by Alzheimer's disease if they felt the support of everyone, friends and strangers alike.
Because some of the emails are heavily redacted, the view of what was actually said between NIH and OHRP is incomplete. And
Honorees of the Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Awards receive a ball-pein hammer as their official award - nicknamed Maslow's
The distinction between weather and climate becomes critical in understanding global warming. Think of weather as a single datum point and climate as a large collection of those data. Better yet, think of weather as a one-night stand. Then climate would be raising the kid resulting from that night for the next two decades.
Dr. Francis Collins joins HuffPost Live at Davos 2014 to share his thoughts on the war on science.
What Congress fails to understand is that they are actively playing with and impacting real people's lives. They are putting lives at risk all for politics. And face it, each party is responsible.
Yesterday I watched as the world's top young high school scientists, researchers and innovators took home more than $3 million in awards. Each of these competing students are a force for profound good.
Evangelical Christians have been shedding their "fundamentalist baggage" and reclaiming a place within deeper traditions of Christian learning and at the table of American cultural life.