Francis Fukuyama

Homo Deus author Yuval Noah Harari talks about what it means to be human in an age when the algorithm is merging big data and biology.
Contra today’s populist spirit, America’s architects delegated authority to the few who would step back from the popular passions of prejudice and narrow self-interest to “refine and enlarge the public views.”
"Populism exists because institutions are elite-driven," but democracies don’t work well without elites, says the acclaimed author of The End of History.
Francis Fukuyama dealt a blow to Hegelian dialectics when he wrote The End of History and the Last Man and before that the
MANILA, Philippines -- "The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion," Edmund Burke, the great 18th century conservative thinker, once warned. Today, a specter is hunting the democratic world -- the specter of autocratic nostalgia.
Autocratic nostalgia is also taking over the Philippines, where Ferdinand Marcos Jr., the only son of the former dictator
The challenge for democrats today, whether in Metro Manila or Washington D.C., is to end dysfunctional forms of decision-making that are giving a bad name to democracy -- the greatest gift of modernity.
As Benigno "NoyNoy" Aquino entered his final year in office, the question of how to assess his legacy has gained greater salience. Both his opponents and supporters have powerful arguments to present.
Soon, the Philippines will be engulfed by an election fever. And in promising emerging markets like the Philippines, electoral cycles are extremely crucial to shaping the short-to-medium term growth trajectory of the country.
Obama may have disliked some of Churchill's activities earlier in his career, but there can be little question that during the West's darkest hour in several centuries, it was Winston Churchill who saved civilization. We face similar challenges today.