free range parenting

“I don't think it should have made it past the hotline," the mother said.
Are parents too protective? It's not an easy question to answer because a whole slew of variables are involved.
Helicopter Parent, Free Range Parent. These terms are so overused they're as thin as my cotton tee shirts have become. I consider myself on the continuum, somewhere between the extremes of ultra-permissive and overprotective. Somewhere sensible, somewhere kinda in the middle. You know, perfect.
Don't view education and knowledge as dangerous or harmful. As your child gets older, the amount he or she knows about the world should increase linearly.
I am always surprised when these parents -- the same ones who are encouraging their children to walk to the park alone, to venture out into the woods, to play without adults around -- say things like "but we always supervise their technology use." Technology. Where even free-range parents seem to stumble.
Some of you are going to read this and think I'm a bully. Perhaps I am. Or maybe I am just a normal person who refuses to be offended by everything and anything. Maybe I am a person who thinks that life is too short to waste on ridiculous nonsense.
While it's unlikely that the halcyon backyard days of the 1950s and '60s will return unblemished, recent high profile cases of so-called "free-range parenting" suggest change may be afoot.
When I was a child, my parents often ignored me. It's not that they were unkind to me. It's that they had full lives of their own and didn't like playing Candy Land.
I do know that my work as a parent is to protect, yes, but also to find ways to push against my kids' boundaries. I want them, after all, to come up with adventures of their own in the years ahead, and feel comfortable selling me on them. That's a version of "free range" I can embrace.
Our neighborhood was a place for us to learn. We thought we were having fun, but through play, we were taking a life skills class taught by life itself.
I realize not everyone has the luxury of living in one of the safest cities on earth. Even Spike Lee is making a movie lovingly entitled, Chiraq. I can actually hear the value of my house going up when I say that word. Chiraq. Cha-ching.
Leaving a child on his own for the first time can make any parent feel a bit anxious. As with many areas of parenting, it requires balancing factors to come to a decision you feel comfortable making.
The debate in the media and around the kitchen table continues to gain momentum. Is free range parenting good or bad for children?
Do you know what we had to cross to get to the store? A HIGHWAY. By ourselves. All alone. At 10, 9 and 6.
When I was a child, we played outside for hours without any adult supervision. My mom checked on us and gave us lunch while she was inside "getting things done." We spent hours using our imaginations and making our own decisions.
Yes, it is important for your child to test himself against his environment. However, that environment needs to be both age-appropriate and safe. Children also need supervision and they may venture out further if they can turn back and know that there is a significant caretaker nearby.
Listen, we trust our sons. They have proven worthy of that trust time and again. They are growing up well and confident. But they're kids, and we're parents.
What has happened in one generation to cause a shift in the definition of a bad parent from "someone who lets her kids play Atari all day" to "someone who doesn't keep her kids inside playing Wii all day"?
Danielle and Alexander Meitiv, the notorious "free range" parents, need to stop battling Child Protective Services and the "parenting police state" for now and start supervising their two young children so they don't lose them.