free trade agreement

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump gave dueling economic addresses this week, offering contrasting visions of where we are now and where each candidate would like to take us.
He worried that a 2011 free trade agreement would help corporations and rich people hide their money.
A free trade agreement (FTA) expands economic opportunity in foreign markets for American workers and businesses, while doing the same for their foreign counterparts in our market. The increased trade improves the overall economy of each country. But, in order to avoid unwanted side effects, modern FTAs do more.
American people deserve an open debate on the objectives of any forthcoming trade agreement in the context of restoring balance to the nation's deteriorating economy, which is imperiling national security.
Jean Young Koo reports on the Free Trade Agreement between China and South Korea This article also appears in China Hands
The memos, which come from a government involved in the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade negotiations, detail
Many hope an agreement on the TPP will provide a much-needed boost to a still prostrate global economy, but what is being widely hailed as profound progress in the evolution of trade integration globally is having the opposite effect in Latin America.
The economy faces a persistent budget crisis. Pushback from Wall Street has gutted most of the banking reforms, unemployment is stuck around 8 percent, corporate profits have been soaring while there is no wage growth -- and the newest White House proposal is... a free trade zone with Europe. This idea of a Trans-Atlantic Free Trade Area was tossed in, reportedly at the last moment, to President Obama's State of the Union, and is being promoted in the government's latest report on trade. You don't know whether to laugh or cry. This is a classic case of changing the subject to a cause that will not address any of the economy's deeper ills and could well worsen them. It recalls the very old joke about the drunk looking for his keys under a lamp post. He mentions to a cop that he lost the keys somewhere else, but "this is where the light is."
The secrecy surrounding the Trans-Pacific deal has sparked a great deal of consternation among public health advocates, consumer
This week, we'll see Congress vote on three so-called "trade agreements." Did you ever wonder why they call them "trade agreements"? So that they don't have to call them what they actually are -- treaties.
How, exactly, is this working? How is this system depriving us of what we need? It's simple -- the cash speaks, the people don't.
Colombia just reached an ignominious benchmark -- it is now the country with the largest population of internally displaced persons in the world
I am 100% in favor of policies that raise our standard of living. What I oppose are trade policies that deindustrialize America, erode the middle class and compromise long-term prosperity.
We skeptics of free trade are used to being told, "You don't understand economics." But I've noticed something. We are often not really struggling against real economics at all.
Since 1986, over 2800 unionists have been assassinated in Colombia. The clear and ever-present danger to organized labor in Colombia is the most salient and undeniable fact about the U.S.' favorite nation in the region.
With President Obama continuing to solidify the U.S.'s relationship with Colombia through a new deal which will give the
"Free trade should be premised on fundamental respect for human rights, especially the rights of the workers producing the goods to be traded. In Colombia, workers cannot exercise their right without fear of being threatened or killed."
One group of social leaders particularly targeted in Colombia -- trade union leaders -- are under increased attack in Colombia
Congress must work with President-elect Obama to design a policy for Colombia in which "free" trade is not built on dead worker representatives.