french elections

Homo Deus author Yuval Noah Harari talks about what it means to be human in an age when the algorithm is merging big data and biology.
Predictions of FN triumph were so wrong because of weak knowledge of French history and political institutions. The Fifth Republic's electoral system is a permanent safeguard against the likelihood that extremist parties can win power.
Rather than sudden and table-overturning victories, the future of the radical right in Western Europe possibly lies in a capacity to be maintained in the very long-term, in modifying their "revolutionary" dimension and in being satisfied with it being a force of rebalancing at the heart of the right.
The "crazy" is everywhere. The question is whether, after the fear subsides, the varying political forces will return to "business as usual" as if nothing fundamental has changed in French politics.
It is often said that politicians live for the day, lacking both a historical perspective and a long-term vision. In many ways the same can be said about media reporting on politics.
France's wrenching shift to the right in last Sunday's regional elections should serve as a warning to American liberals.
I am not convinced that, contrary to the enthusiastic claims of Florian Philippot, the FN vote was a "vote of love." At least, let's hope it isn't the case! But it is, at the very least, a vote of fear.
Channeling frustration with Europe's executive arm, Sarkozy said the European Commission should no longer have legislative
Mrs. Duflot, who presents herself as the guardian of the loftiest questions facing the human race, who supposedly thinks only of the immense challenges that, because they affect us one and all, should occupy a heavenly space of pure ideas, has her feet planted in the same mud in which the most cynically political leftists of the past century waded.
The FN's victories included the towns of Beziers, Le Pontet, Frejus, Beaucaire, Le Luc, Camaret-sur-Aigues and Cogolin in