french politics

Populism is no longer condemned to the extremist edge.
He’s never run for office before, he’s married to his high school teacher and until two years ago, no one had ever heard of him.
Since several French mayors decided to ban from their beaches the "burkini", or full-body bathing suit, worn by some conservative Muslim women, a lot of criticism of French restrictions on women's liberties has resurfaced.
I return here to Jean Birnbaum's book, Un silence religieux, which raises a thorny issue and advances debate by highlighting our systematic underestimation of the spiritual element when analyzing jihadism.
Predictions of FN triumph were so wrong because of weak knowledge of French history and political institutions. The Fifth Republic's electoral system is a permanent safeguard against the likelihood that extremist parties can win power.
marine le pen The French turned out, en masse, to say that they did not want to see the Le Pen gang take possession of their regions. That is the most important lesson from Sunday's vote, and it is a reassuring one. But what caused the nation to right itself?
marine le pen On Sunday, France's worst side won the first round. It must not win the second. This coming Sunday, will the Front National, a despicable party led by a nepotistic clique replete with ex-cons pining for the good old days of wedge politics, gain control of entire regions of the country?
The strength of an intellectual, whether any Little Father of the Peoples like it or not, can rival that of divisions. And that is not counting the damage that André Glucksmann's intellectual action has done to the rationalizations for dictatorship and to the theories of its apologists.
Enough of the indecent psychodrama surrounding Marine Le Pen and her father. Enough of the indulgent, sentimental, and voyeuristic commentary about the daughter "sacrificing" a poor King Lear, leaving him to rave on his moor in St. Cloud. And most of all, enough of the obscene political whitewashing that the entire affair has enabled. Because, after all, what is the reality?
Strange indeed, the story of Michel Houellebecq's latest novel, Soumission, which appeared just before the attack on Charlie Hebdo that left 12 people dead, like an advance echo of the terrible events that have plunged France into mourning, and scaring stiff not only the author's friends but Houellebecq himself.
Read this book right away. Because it carries the echo of the creeping devastation. And because the author proves that there is, in the ruins, another way to live. Not anger, not nostalgia, but insurrection through style.
This is not the first time that Manuel Valls has proposed changing the name of the French Socialist Party. That he has returned to the subject from the vantage point of his present position -- which is, like it or not, the head of the majority -- obviously gives his suggestion new weight.
A growing number of spiritual authorities, from Cairo to Riyadh to Jakarta, have decided, finally, to condemn the crimes of a form of militant Islam of which they had long been far too indulgent.
French Jews certainly have had enough of all this. Are we still at home, they ask themselves, in this strange country where the vilest anti-Zionism, the stubbornest Holocaust denial, and the murkiest competition for victimhood are combining to produce a new and potentially devastating form of anti-Semitism?
The French Socialists' failure in last Sunday's European parliament elections goes deeper in history. Their perennial weakness as a party has characterized French politics for a long time.
France is in danger. In Sunday's elections for the European Parliament, a quarter of France's citizens voted for the worst, choosing the party that was not only anti-Europe but also anti-France.
It was not without pleasure that I read Renaud Girard most recent book, Le monde en marche, which collects the best of the chronicles and reports that have appeared in recent years in Le Figaro. I swear. I protest. About Rwanda, I believe the opposite of what Girard writes. But I lap it up.
"The challenge was to be both funny and true, even in the farce. I wanted the feeling that maybe some of the things are a little bit exaggerated, but basically they are true. Sometimes we cheated a little, but you can feel that it's not invented."
Let me say quite calmly, and adhering strictly to the facts, that the National Front is not the solution sought by voters discouraged by the toxic climate of French politics today.