freshman

You've finished arranging the toss pillows in your freshman's dorm room, so you tell her one last time to eat her vegetables and not to wear white after Labor Day before you issue a lipstick-y kiss goodbye. Then you curl up in the backseat while your spouse drives in silence and you ache. What to do after that day, after you've arrived back home?
Just because your class starts at noon doesn't mean you should roll out of bed at 11:45 am. Get up; take some time to prepare for your day without being rushed -- review homework, eat breakfast, start a daily routine, stretch, etc.
You are embarking on the adventure of a lifetime. Treat it as such.
If you think freshman drop off was hard, think again. All those Bed, Bath & Beyond runs and pillow fluffing were child's play. That's right, the big shebang isn't at drop off, it comes later. At least four years later.
You go to college to learn. That's the whole point of it. After having completed my freshman year, however, I realized that you learn just as much outside the classroom as you do inside it. And, believe me, these lessons will bruise you and break you just as much as the exams and labs do.
But, sadly, the world is going to let you down. A lot. You are going to see awful things happen on the news, and you're going
Your first two months on campus can set the pace for the rest of your college career. Think of it like running a marathon: you want a strong start to guide your attitude and determination through future miles, but set out too fast and you'll be out of fuel before you can finish.
Growing up is tough. Gone are the everlasting summer days when you could spend nights playing tag in your backyard, tasting the sweet morsels of infinite happiness on your playful tongue.
Physically your body is on campus, but emotionally you're connected to friends, family, long distance partners, and strangers off campus. Use technology to meet new people on campus, not to hide from them.
That child you love -- the one you raised from creation that centered your universe, rocked your world and drove lava into your veins at the same time -- yeah that one -- you can't keep him. You have to let him go.
As a gap year, Sally Gardiner-Smith sailed 3,000 miles by herself to college.
Looking back on my first year, like any incoming freshman, I had to learn through trial and error. As a freshman, each week can be a different "ball game." Here are my top five tips that worked well for me through my first nine months of college.
Last year, I was a soon to be college freshman and I didn't even know where to begin with preparing for college. And if there is anything I learned from preparing for my first year of college, it's not to procrastinate.
1. The "Freshman 15" isn't a myth In every group there is that friend who is eternally hungry and just wants to order a pizza
In recognition of our 50th year administering the Freshman Survey at UCLA's Cooperative Institutional Research Program, we are highlighting key findings from each of the first 49 years of data collection on incoming freshman college students.
I had heard all the horror roommate stories of them turning out to be psychopaths. But, lucky for me, all those assumptions were wrong. I may have gotten lucky, but I can confidently say my roommate is my best friend. She deals with all the things my Mom hated about my room back home. Yet, my roommate still loves me for who I am.
It's that remarkable time of year parents of college kids have been looking forward to with excitement and just a little bit of trepidation. While we can't wait to see our kids when they are home for holiday vacation, we are also not exactly clear what to expect.
Once you become reacquainted and reconnected with your child and settle into the holiday spirit, it is then appropriate to discuss the more serious issues and catch up with her semester away from home.