frugality

Was the thought of my home being a "starter home" a reason to leave? I'm sitting here in my mid-thirties with four kids, I can afford something nicer and bigger, so surely I should upgrade from this starter home, right? After all, I'm not "starting" anymore. But the more I thought, the more that term bothered me -- in two different ways.
Legend has it that when Buffett was in high school, he and a friend bought a pinball machine. According to WarrenBuffett.com
It's the holiday season, so most parents I know, including myself, are trying to instill a sense of gratitude in our kids, instead of a greedy "gimme gimme gimme" attitude.
The traditional giving season is upon us, as is the time of year when many people set goals and resolutions for the new year. What better opportunity to look for ways to boost our giving by spending money more efficiently and consciously?
Yes, I bring home and accept free stuff when it crosses my path. There is an overabundance of stuff out there in our world, and there simply aren't enough people willing to accept anything they deem to be less than perfect.
As a therapist, I always encourage people to clarify their values and live in a way that makes them proud, happy, and fulfilled.  This is usually not through the accumulation of material possessions and staying in jobs you don't like to make more money.  
While none of these nine money saving tips are life-changing on their own and some may not even apply to you, the important takeaway is that there are hundreds of easy ways to save money. Just choose a few, apply them to your life on a regular basis, and see the difference they make.
Debt is the four-letter word Americans hate to hear. Today, the average American household has debts totaling around $7,200. According to Aimee Picchi on CBS Moneywatch, American household credit card debt is increasing despite the fact that average household earnings have not experienced a similar increase to account for that new debt.
If the eye-rolling and heavy sighs of impatient customers waiting for the cashier to process your stack of coupons leave you utterly mortified, extreme couponing might not be for you. But, that doesn't mean you should avoid couponing altogether.
Talk about a sexy blog title. The word "frugal" does not score high in the sexy department, but that is something I am committed to change. This summer I will turn 50. I am, in my ripe age, learning to be (deep breath)... frugal.
If you saw a $20 bill on the sidewalk, you'd definitely bend over to pick it up, wouldn't you? Well, without much more effort than that, you can save at least that much -- and probably a lot more -- by employing a host of everyday life hacks.
Raising a family on a budget is a daunting task. From infancy up to adulthood, having kids is expensive and it takes a lot of creativity and strategy to keep the finances in order.
We asked 30 major bloggers and personal finance experts to share both the most bizarre things they've ever done to save money -- and the lessons they learned through the experience.
Saving money is one of the hardest things to do on a consistent basis. An estimated 28 percent of Americans don't have any money set aside for emergencies at all, and just under half of the American population claims to have less than three months' worth of household expenses saved.
A few weeks ago I was leading a wealth seminar for a dozen women, all between the ages of 40-55. They were successful entrepreneurs, businesswomen with decades of experience and between them, thousands of contacts.
It takes a unique (and financially committed) person to face the daily challenges of a frugal lifestyle. Whether you're living the cheap life by choice or by necessity, there are few circumstances only frugal people will ever understand.
I didn't understand why my parents didn't spend money -- and why they never let themselves live a little or take a break from the never-ending quest to save that last dollar. By the time I left for college, I was tired of feeling embarrassed about money, and vowed that I'd finally live the life I thought I deserved as an adult.
I normally don't set a concrete budget for myself, but this year I've decided to aim for a zero dollar Christmas/Chanukah/birthday season. Yes, you read that right. Zero dollars, as in nothing, nada, bupkis.
We've all seen it on the internet, in television and probably on the radio. Black Friday shoppers are made to look like selfish idiots. I just want to take a moment though to explain why Black Friday shoppers are not villains.