frugality

Actor Terry Crews is one of the funniest guys around. He's hilarious as the Old Spice man, stole the show as a boot camp instructor in Bridesmaids and makes audiences laugh every week on Brooklyn Nine-Nine. But huge fans of Terry (like me) remember him in one of his earliest roles -- the TV-father of the then-young Chris Rock on the show Everybody Hates Chris.
Was the thought of my home being a "starter home" a reason to leave? I'm sitting here in my mid-thirties with four kids, I can afford something nicer and bigger, so surely I should upgrade from this starter home, right? After all, I'm not "starting" anymore. But the more I thought, the more that term bothered me -- in two different ways.
4. Graduate College Early 11. Find a Business Partner Find a business partner that you trust and ultimately challenges your
It's the holiday season, so most parents I know, including myself, are trying to instill a sense of gratitude in our kids, instead of a greedy "gimme gimme gimme" attitude.
The traditional giving season is upon us, as is the time of year when many people set goals and resolutions for the new year. What better opportunity to look for ways to boost our giving by spending money more efficiently and consciously?
Yes, I bring home and accept free stuff when it crosses my path. There is an overabundance of stuff out there in our world, and there simply aren't enough people willing to accept anything they deem to be less than perfect.
As a therapist, I always encourage people to clarify their values and live in a way that makes them proud, happy, and fulfilled.  This is usually not through the accumulation of material possessions and staying in jobs you don't like to make more money.  
While none of these nine money saving tips are life-changing on their own and some may not even apply to you, the important takeaway is that there are hundreds of easy ways to save money. Just choose a few, apply them to your life on a regular basis, and see the difference they make.
Debt is the four-letter word Americans hate to hear. Today, the average American household has debts totaling around $7,200. According to Aimee Picchi on CBS Moneywatch, American household credit card debt is increasing despite the fact that average household earnings have not experienced a similar increase to account for that new debt.