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Chinese-processed chicken can easily appear on school lunch trays, despite the USDA's initial statement to the contrary. That means we may be exposing an especially vulnerable population -- children -- to potential food safety risks.
That's right: The agency charged with enforcing the Humane Slaughter Act refuses to enforce it for more than 98 percent of slaughtered animals.
A Northern California company is recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products because it processed diseased and unhealthy animals without a full federal inspection, federal officials said Saturday.
You may recall our 2009 investigation of Bushway -- a calf slaughter plant in Grand Isle, Vermont, where we found calves
American public institutions have a long track record of keeping our food disease-free. Yet as this service is increasingly outsourced to for-profit corporations, it is leading to repeated oversight failures that have caused illness and even death.
Humane handling has increasingly become an important issue to the American public, and rightly so. The discerning public demands that the animals that go into those packages on our shelves are treated humanely before giving their lives to our service.
CDC investigators are a vital link in the chain of public protection because they are the people who "trace back" illness to its source. Obviously, knowing someone has salmonella poisoning is not enough: we also need to know which food from what company gave them the disease.
Washington dumped some more bad news Friday afternoon when the USDA's Office of Inspector General issued a damning and unsettling report on the department's "National Residue Program for Cattle."