future of life institute

"How do we make sure that everybody can make a living?"
"[My nephew was] transformed into a charred, blackened and swollen child who kept asking in a faint voice for water until he died in agony.”
"Nothing could be more important than avoiding the extermination of humanity."
While economists debate the extent to which technology plays a role in global inequality, most agree that tech advances have exacerbated the problem.
Unlike nuclear weapons, this new class can potentially target by traits like race or even by what people have liked on social media.
We know that nuclear weapons are scary, but we must be much louder in defining them as unacceptable, as illegitimate. By following the money, we can cut it off, and while this isn't the only thing necessary to make nuclear weapons extinct, it will help.
Obama got us moving in the right direction, but when you are fleeing a forest fire, it is not just a question of direction but also of speed. Can we get to safety before catastrophe engulfs us?
After the December 15 Republican debate, Donald Trump caught some flack for not seeming to know what the nuclear triad is. But how familiar are most people with what the nuclear triad involves?
This Thanksgiving, as we enjoy family time together and possibly a few good deals on items we've been waiting for, let's remember to be grateful for what we have and optimistic that, if we prepare properly, the "robot apocalypse" could usher in a new era of quality family time and leisure.
When I first heard about this doomsday device in Stanley Kubrik's dark nuclear satire Dr. Strangelove, I wasn't sure if it was physically possible. Now, I unfortunately know better, and it seems like it Russia may be building it.
Numerous articles have recently raised concerns that robots will soon be taking over everyone's jobs. Nowhere is this more evident than in hospitals and nursing homes, where artificial intelligence and automation have led to increasing levels of productivity from robotic devices.
If universities are the bellwether of social change, as they have often been in times past, then the enthusiasm and captivation that EA has brought out at Harvard and other institutions of higher learning may well trickle to the rest of the population.
The combination of gesturing towards what are usually called "important ethical issues," while steadfastly putting off serious discussion of them, is pretty typical in our technology debates.