gamal abdel nasser

As we drove there, the revolutionaries discussed their fear of disclosing their identities lest they be arrested. But I had been assured by the prime minister that they would be safe. I trusted him to keep to his word, and my confidence had grown since the snipers had stopped shooting the previous night.
Palestinian extremists once almost shot down an Israeli airliner carrying around 400 people. This spy, known as "the Angel," stopped them.
The Middle East has turned hostile to Christians and other religious minorities. The Iraqi Christian community has been devastated. Syria's civil war loosed the murderous Islamic State on Christians and others. Libya's disintegration opened the nation to IS fighters bent on killing anyone of the wrong faith.
Ignoring such clear statements of intent, we are instead served bromides by the likes of State Department spokesman Mark
President Barack Obama held a news conference but seemed to focus on Donald Trump which begs the question -- if Trump cannot
Gamal Abdel Nasser was one of the most influential modern-day leaders in the Middle East. He took a hard-line approach towards Western domination of Egypt and the rest of the Arab world.
Human rights have been a curious case when it comes to the UAE and the other Gulf Arab states for quite some time. The most widely reported concerns in the Emirates have had to do with workers in Dubai, the UAE's second city.
While the country's legacy media did their share of covering the stellar event, mostly in lockstep with the government's
One can't blame journalists in Egypt for being confused about what they can (and can't) cover and what language to use in their reports, given the widening chasm between authorities and countless news organizations.
The public discussion about the causes of violent extremism has focused mainly on the socioeconomic and political conditions that exist in Arab countries. But we must also carefully consider how the events in the wake of World Wars I and II have impacted the psychological disposition of the Arab population throughout the Middle East.
In any case, Washington's influence is limited: The Sisi regime will do whatever it believes necessary to retain power. Whatever America does, Egypt is likely to end up without liberty or stability. Washington should step back from a crisis that it can't resolve.
Instead of acting as the regime's enabler, the Obama administration should "reset" relations with Cairo. The U.S. should cut off all aid and withdraw America's ambassador. If Washington has any influence to exercise, it should do so quietly and informally
Washington's best hope is to disengage, leaving Egyptians to decide their own future. The administration should simply point to the law. A coup has occurred and the democratic process has been overthrown by the military, so aid must be halted.
Several Royal Air Force officers also asked that a portion of the polo grounds be set aside and allotted pro rata to RAF
As a citizen of a country that had to live through five coup d'états and military memorandums in last five decades, I advise my Egyptian friends to beware of any type of military rule. A day will come when a new generation of writers grown up on Naguib Mahfouz's books will tell the story of today's coup.
The country is going to be torn apart over this coup, and undoing everything Egyptians fought so hard for in the revolution of 2012. This is exactly the sort of oppressive autocratic rule the people rallied against.
Over the weekend, Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi announced that he was cutting all ties with Syria, to include unilaterally ending the long-maintained diplomatic relationship between the two Arab countries and closing Egypt's embassy in Damascus.
Lloyd Gardner's Road to Tahrir Square exposes how the U.S. empowered Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak with the "tools of repression" for the past 30 years and the extent to which American policymakers have shaped Egypt's destiny, including the very outcome of its historic revolution.
In one Cairo district, 75-year-old Amr Moussa, a former foreign minister and Arab League secretary-general, stood in a queue