gaokao

It's always exciting to visit the PRC. But it is most interesting to learn about China, which is vastly larger, more complex, and humane than the nominal communist state which still rules. It's impossible to predict what China will ultimately become. Most important is that it becomes free, consigning today's authoritarian regime to history's dustbin. Then the people of China will be able to decide their own future.
Somewhere, deep in the mists of the past, there may have once been a good reason for requiring testing. But that reason seems so far beside the point that it recedes invisibly.
In China, the children of the privileged can sail off into lives made smooth by their families, always scoring highest, getting into the best programs, and ultimately finding their way to the top leadership of the nation. Sound familiar?
Even if women are represented in equal numbers, if they are relegated to fields that are not as respected or to universities that have lower prestige, all the while having to demonstrate higher levels of accomplishment, this is not balance. It is not equality. It is, pure and simple, discrimination.
Critics argue that the be-all, end-all status of the gaokao encourages students to pursue unhealthy behavior to gain an edge
"This year is my fourth time coming here, but I still feel nervous as if I am sitting in the exam room, as the students remind
If teaching in China taught me anything, it taught me to be very skeptical of high stakes testing. It distorts curricula, makes teaching a chore, and favors the rich.
Our educational system is brutal and dehumanizing, but the acceptance letter you receive will not determine your fate, job, happiness, or how much you will learn in the next four years.
Dozens of runners competing in a marathon in Xiamen, China cheated, according to race officials. Nearly a third of the race's