Gary Hart

Like its characters’ blow-out hair and brick-sized cell phones, the film -- starring Hugh Jackman -- plays out like a relic.
The movie chronicles Hart’s ascendant 1988 Democratic presidential campaign before an extramarital affair torpedoed his political career.
Here of course we are into psychology rather than "psychohistory." Like Asimov's fake predictive science, the statistical
Of course, as with some other things, he may not really mean it. His twittering was certainly incoherent enough. The Grateful
Orci liked the idea of bringing back Hemsworth through some scifi magic -- perhaps a blast from the past not unlike the reintroduction
** Rudy Giuliani as secretary of state?! Hey, maybe not so crazy. I kinda like Giuliani, whom I've interviewed a few times
The idea that Russian intelligence would intervene to delegitimize the Clintons here and around the world was anything but
Hillary carried the Pacific Coast, most resoundingly here in California with a blowout 61 percent to 33 percent margin over
Meanwhile, CSNY bootleg collectors have put together versions of the projected album, based on various recordings of the
Trump knows that white blue-collar voters will overlook his economic portfolio if they think he understands their values and needs rather than trying to imitate them.
In this year of mostly misfiring big budget genre films, the rather belated return of star Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrass to the 'Jason Bourne' espionage franchise is a rare solid success.
People need to get this through some rather thick skulls. It can happen here. Donald Trump can be elected president. This country can become a much bigger mess than it already is.
Rev. Jesse Jackson faced doubts and death threats when he ran for the White House. He also inspired some notable young politicians.
Hillary Clinton's very impressive New York primary victory over Bernie Sanders points up some of her most significant strengths as a political figure. She generally performs quite well on a big stage. And there are few bigger presidential primary stages than that of New York.
The constant media frame for the shocking-to-many success of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders is that both campaigns represent the rejection of elites in favor of populism, albeit contradictory populisms of the right and left. Would that it were so simplistic.
Generally presented as some sort of out-of-the-blue challenge to the orthodoxy of our financialized politics, the Sanders vs. Clinton battle actually has deep roots in decades past.
Trump's New Hampshire primary triumph vindicates his media-centric campaign and again emphasize the dominance of Trumpism -- his effective hijacking of the aggregated bloc of angry reactionaries largely assembled by Fox News, which ironically now cannot take him down -- in the Republican Party as a whole.
Voting is finally about to begin in the Republican and Democratic presidential primary contests. That's exciting. But it may not last.
Elections take place in the now, not the long-term, especially in an ahistorical American era. And the now these days in this ADD/hyper-partisan media environment is short-term and savagely prone to character assassination.