gay equality

I am grateful to the gay men and women who came before me and fought so hard for us to have basic rights. The kind of bravery that it took to fight during Stonewall, to fight during the AIDS crisis, to fight against Don't Ask, Don't Tell, humbles me.
The Bulls (drag queens, black, white, Puerto Ricans, lesbians, and transgender people) ignited a flame and started a stampede
Rockwell once gave us an idealized America, but he went on to provide illustrations of the difficult aspects of our nation, as well: racial conflict, civil rights, violence, poverty. Rockwell's America was complex and rich in its diversity. Kim Davis' America is an illusion.
Women and minorities have secured some rights that are here to stay -- different for each group -- while other rights are still elusive or being stripped away. There is always a backlash to equality, and it could last a very long time, as bigotry doesn't die easily. Like every group, LGBT people have to remain vigilant.
A young gay writer just published an opinion piece telling people to stop displaying the rainbow flag colors on their profile photos. Why? Because "[g]ay pride is not something you can claim by waving a flag." Because "[t]he rainbow symbol is easy to co-opt, but the experience it represents is not." Because these people "were celebrating a victory they had no part in winning."
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that same-sex couples will soon have the freedom to marry and equal respect for their marriages across America. This ruling will bring joy to families, and final victory to the decades-long marriage movement. Here are some of the lessons learned over the years that could apply to other progressive social movements.
As the Supreme Court's ruling on same-sex marriage bans looms, the right wing has begun their assault on reason and intellect with the standard dire warnings, threats, and fear mongering in the form of corporate boycotts and revolt. As usual, their claims include flagrant misinterpretations of their favorite documents, the Constitution and the Bible.
A record 60 percent of Americans now favor same-sex marriage rights, according to a new Gallup poll, and lesbian, gay, bisexual
The landslide victory for marriage equality in Ireland caught some conservatives off guard. What happened to the staunchly conservative, almost fanatical Catholicism of the Irish people? Paul Valleley, a professor of public ethics at the University of Chester, offered some important suggestions. He lists two major reasons.
With the support of the American business community, which is coming to the fore for equality as never before, we might just be able to accomplish what no one has thought possible: a federal LGBT Civil Rights Act produced by a Republican Congress.