Gay Liberation

My partner and I took my sister to Darcelle XV Showplace Saturday night for her birthday. Darcelle XV hosts the longest continuously
Becoming conscious of my sexuality and finally coming out began with my involvement in religious youth activities: Summer camp, retreats and then conferences turned out to be hotbeds of hetero- and homo-eroticism.
In short: Truth is sanitized -- revised to comport with a preset idea of how it was Way Back When.
HuffPost Gay Voiced editor Noah Michelson joins HuffPost Live to discuss his blog post, "Why I Never Want To Be Just Like Straight People."
What's got me so despondent (and dramatic)? A couple of recent blog posts that appeared on HuffPost Gay Voices, lamenting, worrying about or lashing out at queers (like me) who don't want to live a heteronormative life.
Marriage litigation played an important political role in gay liberation's heady early years. Between 1970 and 1972, among the dozen or so American same-sex couples who sought civil marriage licenses, three pursued lawsuits to the bitter end.
I've reached a conclusion: I'm not gay. Oh, don't misunderstand me. I am definitely homosexual, 100-percent. Honey, I loves me some big, juicy mens. I just don't have the trappings to be a 21st-century gay. I am what I think of as "post-gay."
For over a decade after Stonewall, a gay man could have sex in New York almost anywhere, anytime, 24/7. Today, in part because of AIDS, very few of those cruising sites still exist. In our desire to acquire civil rights equal to the straight community, we have chosen to assimilate.
My discomfort in watching the joyous reactions to recent gains for marriage equality stems from my understanding of the Stonewall rebellion as an impetus for revolutionary change within an oppressive social structure, as opposed to mere reform, accommodation, or assimilation.
Pride parades, or "gay liberation protests," as they were first called, have been critical to bringing about LGBT rights all over the world. But we've abandoned their initial purpose as a call for equality. We owe it to ourselves, and to our history, to call upon our rich activist traditions.