Gay Liberation Front

With the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States instead of Chief Judge Merrick
My discomfort and concern when watching the Rose Parade marriage ceremony stems from my understanding of the Stonewall rebellion as an impetus for revolutionary change within an overridingly oppressive social structure, as opposed to mere reform, accommodation, or assimilation.
The question has been raised: is the point of the gay rights movement to make us accepted as normal, or to get the larger society to accept what makes us special?
I am heartened by the new focus on gender expression and its significance for gay as well as trans persons, and hopeful that such a focus will force our state and national advocacy organizations to evolve in a manner that will benefit all of us, and in particular the least among us.
Marriage litigation played an important political role in gay liberation's heady early years. Between 1970 and 1972, among the dozen or so American same-sex couples who sought civil marriage licenses, three pursued lawsuits to the bitter end.
My discomfort in watching the joyous reactions to recent gains for marriage equality stems from my understanding of the Stonewall rebellion as an impetus for revolutionary change within an oppressive social structure, as opposed to mere reform, accommodation, or assimilation.
I graduated with my B.A. degree on June 13, 1969 -- 15 days before the momentous Stonewall rebellion. As a graduating senior the concept of an "out" person, let alone an organized, above-ground student organization, was not even in my range of possibilities.
Did you know that the Mafia owned the Stonewall Inn when the famous riots took place in 1969? Or that there were originally
They were the riots that spawned a revolution, the nights of protest that led to the dawn of the gay rights movement. Forty