GED

Graduation Day. It's a rite of passage that these days pretty much every student, from preschoolers to post grads, has been entitled to. The caps, the gowns, the celebrations; but what about those who have struggled with secondary education, for one reason or another?
So, counting those who take the GED as dropouts ("losers"?) because they don't graduate with their high school cohort, or
Last year when changes to the GED programs were first announced, analysts predicted it would have a serious impact on the ability of prisoners to acquire their certificates. A year later, those predictions have proven accurate.
Five years ago, more than half a million adults in Philadelphia lacked basic literacy and work skills, imperiling their ability to land jobs and climb out of poverty, the Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board reported.
The GED was overhauled last year, and the number of people who passed the test plummeted. So is something wrong with the high school equivalency exam, or are the numbers deceiving? What kind of education do high school dropouts need to succeed?
What was I, a black 19-year-old female college student, doing inside an all-male correctional facility? Everyone I had told about my volunteering had been skeptical.
Since YouthBuild was authorized as a federal program in 1992, community-based YouthBuild programs in over 270 urban and rural communities in America have welcomed and embraced more than 130,000 young people.
As the only high school diploma equivalency tests accepted by all 50 states, changes to GED has a huge impact on the millions of people who hope to earn credentials equivalent to a high school diploma. This is particularly onerous on the poor.
Most high school dropouts don't end up with successful careers in Hollywood. I was lucky. Compared with high school graduates, dropouts are more likely to be unemployed, in poor health, living in poverty or on public assistance.
It is essential for adult education and community colleges to partner to provide clear articulation paths, and for adult education courses to prepare students for college or careers without the need for remediation.
The GED no longer has a lock on the market for tests that serve as the equivalent of a high school degree. Three states have
In elementary school and junior high, I was a bad little boy. You could find me in the principal’s office almost every day
This isn't about having a choice of providers, but rather a choice about the future of adult education and preparing adults to earn family sustaining wages.
With a new mayor to be elected this year, who will take over in 2014, the city stands poised to take a much more aggressive effort to make its CTE programs not merely adequate, but to take a role as the innovation leader in the nation.
As it turns out, how people behave in one setting does not predict how they will behave in a very different setting.
Learning to read has changed my life. Now, it's easier to get around the city. You give me an address and I know how to get there. I don't have to worry about asking someone. I can pick up my Bible now and read it, or my newspaper. I might get stuck, but I can do it.
Shearwater is identifying children who were thrown away by broken systems, and giving them the grit and determination to metaphorically clean themselves off and try again.
The new GED test has the potential to leave thousands of D.C. adults behind. The price of the GED will effectively make it inaccessible for those who need it the most: low-income and low-skilled adults.
Every year, roughly 750,000 high school dropouts try to improve their educational and employment prospects by taking the
A relatively quick, cheap, and instructionally legitimate change to state law could raise graduation rates without lowering standards.