gene hackman

The resultant BBC Radio 4 program And The Academy Award Goes To... featuring The French Connection was recently aired and it brought it all back for former NYPD detective Grosso, who went onto a sterling career as a television and movie producer.
I was recently chatting with filmmaker Edward Burns who was excitedly talking about his new drama series, Public Morals, which premieres on August 25 on TNT. He was grateful that I'd found the series compelling with a host of outstanding elements from cinematography, set design and costuming to music.
I have an actor friend who gets through a crowd and gets through life with one over-riding rule: don't make eye contact. It's a great and effective policy, especially for stars who inspire a dangerous sense of possession in fans when in the open public.
Hidden pearls exist in the world of movies, as well: films that, in spite of being brilliantly crafted and executed, never got the audience they deserved beyond a cult following.
Stress kills, goes the old saying, and can cause a host of maladies before it does. Hypertension, heart disease and even Bruxism, otherwise known as grinding of the teeth, can be its unfortunate byproducts. So, here are 10 examples of stress in on-screen and its most masterful portraits.
The recently much-maligned liberal arts curriculum, taken seriously, is a ticket not only to a first job after graduation, but to a leadership position in the most challenging professions.
What makes French films, eh, French? The facile answer: a focus on love: married, obsessive, at first sight. In its 20th season the popular Rendez Vous at Lincoln Center, shows a penchant for action adventure -- and, serial killers.
I have been forced to come to a hard-pressed realization that makes my shoulders fall, and my heart heavy: I am falling out of love with Wes Anderson.
Grosso says Jack's visit sent Rao's influential clientele into a tizzy but what was so heart-warming was that Nicholson himself had presented the Best Picture Oscar to The French Connection's producer Phil D'Antoni back at the 44th Academy Awards.
From Nietzschean philosophizing cops (McConaughey) to a female Ranger, cop shows have come a long way from Dragnet's Jack Webb (1951-59) droning his catchphrase, "All we want are the facts, ma'am..."