Generation Why

First off, recognize and acknowledge your BIG RED BUTTONS. Own them. Get familiar with them. Understand their triggers and
I spoke at the congress about the innovative ways we can address the needs of adolescents and young adults living with metastatic and/or advanced cancer. Here are six summary items I think you should know about the conference:
A triangle shape can be as sturdy as a square. At first, it might be difficult to trust that the three-legged table will be as strong, as balanced, as safe as the four-legged one was. But it can be done. That table can be redesigned, remade, resilient. This is what happened to us.
The Grammy-nominated, relatively anonymous producer announced his 2016 Neon City tour.
For the full program, please visit http://www.youthcancerevent.com.au/summit/program 6. Sessions included relevant and important
I often hear, "I'm so happy you're done with treatment! Now you can get back to where you were." The latter is simply is false. My life will never go back to the way it once was. My challenge now is to figure out what my new life looks like.
Every person's grief is unique. How you choose to honor the passing of a loved one is up to you. If I could say one thing to others dealing with loss in the midst of these festive times, it would be this: Give yourself permission to live through the holidays however you need to.
Trust was gone. It just wasn't fun anymore. Our student enrollment decreased and we reduced our fleet of airplanes.
Weeks later, glaring at the homeless man on the street, I realize that in this moment I have lost my ability to feel compassion
And, this story is for you, to make you aware of this disease. To make you aware of the fact that asbestos is still legal in the U.S. Finally, this story is meant to show the world what hope can do. I'd be honored if you joined me on this journey into the past, present, and future.
Fast forward six years, a surgery to remove a grapefruit sized tumor, four rounds of chemo and then three rounds of IVF to
Now eight years after college I wonder if I could I ever do what Rachel did -- live with cancer without any possibility of a cure, all while never letting up on exclamation points?
There will be a few challenges along the way, and here's a big one. You found your life's mate and you are ready to start a family. The only trouble is, because of your medical history, your body is incapable of holding a pregnancy to term.
I strongly believe everything happens for a reason. Had terminal cancer not happened to me, I would not have been able to inspire my closest friends and family to appreciate the beautiful gift of life a little more and live more appreciative and positive lives with my story.
Fear means different things to different people. To some, fear manifests as anger. For others, fear is sorrow. For each person, identifying their fears is an intensely personal part of LungLeavin' Day.
Imagine you are a young adult, in your 20s or even early 30s. You haven't been feeling well lately, shake it off and then finally decide to make an appointment with your physician.
This past October, I was part of an unlikely and impromptu chorus singing at the funeral service for "Princess" Evey Cannon who died from cancer at the unfair and tender age of four years old.
Linda Sim was just 25 when she got the news about her boyfriend Allen Chou's diagnosis, when he was just 27. In a ceremony
I sat up and as much as I could, gathered the heart monitor's leeds to the side, and brought Aura's body sort of close to mine. I pressed her ear against my chest. We were speechless, so she might as well just listen to my heart, and I might as well just breathe.