genetically modified foods

In 2014, Vermont passed the first legislation in the U.S. to require labeling of foods containing genetically engineered ingredients. A year earlier, Connecticut and Maine also passed GMO labeling bills though these were dependent on several other states passing similar laws.
Industry groups are behind an aggressive push to make it harder to know if your food contains GMOs.
Retailers have historically been, and continue to be, a critical part of the Right to Know Movement. So the next time you see your local store's shelves stocked with non-GMO options, remember to thank that retailer for helping to make a difference in the future of our food system.
I've taken a tiny sampling of the industry's talking points and looked a little deeper. The following claims come from the Coalition for Safe Affordable Food. The arguments they are propagating are beyond flawed and incomplete: They are downright wrong.
Multiple national surveys have been conducted about GMO labeling and the consumer's right to know what's in our food. The results have been fairly consistent: more than 90% of Americans are in favor of knowing when they are eating foods make with genetically modified ingredients.
"Consumers deserve to understand what that word natural means on a package," Finkel said. Another provision would make it
GMOs are living organisms, including plants and animals, that have had their genetic code altered. The technology is often
Lobbyists for leading pesticide and junk food companies aren't very creative, at least when it comes to fighting labels on genetically-engineered foods. The current effort Washington State against labeling is looking strikingly similar to last year's in California.
While some may prefer a national solution to labeling GE foods versus going state by state, history has shown that Washington, D.C. is gridlocked and we won't get movement at the federal level until the states take action on this issue.
2. There are no long-term safety studies in humans. Thus, the long-term health effects are unknown. Instead of canola, corn