genetically modified foods

In 2014, Vermont passed the first legislation in the U.S. to require labeling of foods containing genetically engineered ingredients. A year earlier, Connecticut and Maine also passed GMO labeling bills though these were dependent on several other states passing similar laws.
Industry groups are behind an aggressive push to make it harder to know if your food contains GMOs.
Retailers have historically been, and continue to be, a critical part of the Right to Know Movement. So the next time you see your local store's shelves stocked with non-GMO options, remember to thank that retailer for helping to make a difference in the future of our food system.
By adopting smart new innovations and other helpful agricultural strategies, and by working to limit greenhouse gas emissions before they climb much higher, we can pave the way for a century where more people can enjoy safe, nutritious, affordable food than they ever have before.
I've taken a tiny sampling of the industry's talking points and looked a little deeper. The following claims come from the Coalition for Safe Affordable Food. The arguments they are propagating are beyond flawed and incomplete: They are downright wrong.
Calling a GE food natural is like saying black is white or up is down.
Multiple national surveys have been conducted about GMO labeling and the consumer's right to know what's in our food. The results have been fairly consistent: more than 90% of Americans are in favor of knowing when they are eating foods make with genetically modified ingredients.
Another provision would make it mandatory for biotech crop developers to notify the Food and Drug Administration before they
I don't necessarily think GMOs are bad, but I sure do believe we are entitled to know what is in the food that we eat. If a food product contains GMOs, there should be a sticker, label or ID on the package that is plainly visible, letting shoppers know before they purchase the product!
In 2014, voters in Colorado may be the next to decide on mandatory labeling for foods that contain genetically modified ingredients
The junk food lobby's "federal solution" is to make it illegal for states to pass laws requiring GMO labeling. Period. End of story. This is not the way preemption is supposed to work.
Lobbyists for leading pesticide and junk food companies aren't very creative, at least when it comes to fighting labels on genetically-engineered foods. The current effort Washington State against labeling is looking strikingly similar to last year's in California.
While some may prefer a national solution to labeling GE foods versus going state by state, history has shown that Washington, D.C. is gridlocked and we won't get movement at the federal level until the states take action on this issue.
Salads can be a safe option, but ask for cruets with olive oil and vinegar instead of other salad dressings. Despite the
The research related to GMOs can be hard to sort through. One study may find health problems in animals, but then proponents and biotech scientists say the study is flawed. But are there any scientists that question the safety and effectiveness of GMOs?
Soon, there are going to be some ingredients missing from your Ben & Jerry’s. Don’t worry -- the basics like chocolate chips
Have you noticed that when it comes to food policy, the U.S. Congress isn't always an unflinching champion of the public interest? Today, you have an opportunity to do something about that.
With a farm policy of "get big or get out" that only benefits big and increasingly consolidated companies, which wield unprecedented power over the market and put small and midsized farmers out of business, it's no accident that we're here.
Mounting calls in the U.S. for the labeling of GE foods also represents a huge problem for the likes of Monsanto: What will happen to demand for GE seeds once consumers actually have a real choice over whether or not they consume GE food?