genetically modified foods

In 2014, Vermont passed the first legislation in the U.S. to require labeling of foods containing genetically engineered ingredients. A year earlier, Connecticut and Maine also passed GMO labeling bills though these were dependent on several other states passing similar laws.
Industry groups are behind an aggressive push to make it harder to know if your food contains GMOs.
Retailers have historically been, and continue to be, a critical part of the Right to Know Movement. So the next time you see your local store's shelves stocked with non-GMO options, remember to thank that retailer for helping to make a difference in the future of our food system.
By adopting smart new innovations and other helpful agricultural strategies, and by working to limit greenhouse gas emissions before they climb much higher, we can pave the way for a century where more people can enjoy safe, nutritious, affordable food than they ever have before.
I've taken a tiny sampling of the industry's talking points and looked a little deeper. The following claims come from the Coalition for Safe Affordable Food. The arguments they are propagating are beyond flawed and incomplete: They are downright wrong.
Calling a GE food natural is like saying black is white or up is down.
Multiple national surveys have been conducted about GMO labeling and the consumer's right to know what's in our food. The results have been fairly consistent: more than 90% of Americans are in favor of knowing when they are eating foods make with genetically modified ingredients.
"Consumers deserve to understand what that word natural means on a package," Finkel said. Another provision would make it
I don't necessarily think GMOs are bad, but I sure do believe we are entitled to know what is in the food that we eat. If a food product contains GMOs, there should be a sticker, label or ID on the package that is plainly visible, letting shoppers know before they purchase the product!