genomics

Suzan Mazur: If you were organizing a public evolution summit, what discoveries in biology would you showcase? Eugene Koonin
And we will have many more results to report, especially about what happens after participants get their sequencing results back.
The information we gather from our DNA will be far more than mere biological coordinates. Instead, it will impact many parts of our everyday lives.
It may be true that we have entered the age of personal genomics, but we have only just scratched the surface.
Medical technology pioneers believe that 100 years of age will become the new 60 as scientific breakthroughs, software and
Your brother recently died of a rare form of cancer. You know that he had been participating in a study on the genetics of this cancer, and that as part of the study, researchers promised that they would send him his individual results.
The Berggruen Philosophy and Culture Center recently brought a diverse group of neuroscientists and philosophers together with Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and programmers to answer this question: As developments in artificial intelligence extend or surpass human intelligence, do they challenge the traditional definition of what it means to be human? Here's what five of them had to say.
It has only 473 genes, and many of them are a complete mystery.
But Alec also has a few things he'd like to say to parents, too. Chief among them: Steal a page from dear old mom, Becky
To answer these questions, my team and I set out to talk to creators of humanity's future, people working with our emerging
Alec Ross served as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's senior advisor for innovation. During that role, he earned unique insight into the changing nature of technology. In his new book, "The Industries of the Future," Ross not only lays out the key industries that will shape the 21st century, but also provides the geopolitical, cultural and generational contexts out of which they are emerging. Berggruen Institute's Dawn Nakagawa sat down with Ross to discuss the book.
When NASA searches for life on other planets, it is not sufficient to just find life, but to ask the question, why did each stage (animated, free will, bioton, & entity) of stochastic dominance succeed or fail?
As individuals, all we can do for now is keep contributing to cancer research, voting for candidates who support intensified research funding, and hoping that this latest moonshot initiative will fulfill our wildest hopes and dreams for controlling this equal-opportunity killer.
Now more than ever, we understand that nearly every single health condition is either primarily caused by, or its course influenced by, one's DNA.
I think we're in a fascinating time, watching technological advancements in forensic sciences. We're close to the day when your tiny biological dropping at the scene of your crime will go into a machine, the button pressed, and a full-color, 3D image of your entire person right from your molecules to your moles.
There are hundreds of stories I could tell from my recent trip to Ethiopia four months ago-- stories of similarities and differences, of opportunity and challenges. But I want to focus here on the reason for my trip and what I hope I accomplished.
New forms of genetic testing can predict whether a couple will have a child with cystic fibrosis, guide doctors in selecting the most effective chemotherapy for a breast cancer patient, and help researchers unlock the causes of Alzheimer's. But they also raise serious ethical questions.
At age 42, Holly Boehle was diagnosed with aggressive breast cancer. Fortunately, the cancer cells have been banished by chemotherapy targeted against a specific genetic abnormality in her tumor.
One might think I would be disappointed after 15 years of anticipation, but I'm not. This first glimpse of my DNA was interesting, but it's what comes next that I'm excited about.