genre fiction

5. Full Tilt and All In, by Emma Scott, Independent, June 28, 2016. Inspirational Romance. See what I did there? I cheated
As the author of over fifty works of fiction, people have asked me why I don't concentrate my work and pursue a single genre. They point out that genre writers, especially those who specialize in serial genres, reap the greatest commercial rewards. They have a point and the evidence is clear.
The contempt these mystery readers sometimes feel directed at them gets recycled as they express disdain for books they don't like which have been written and enjoyed by people they have to denigrate. That's not an argument or even a defense: it's blatant insecurity.
What are these writers despairing or gloating over? Word count. Some authors--particularly those high-stepping their way
Do you feel there are significant differences between genre and literary fiction? Not in my case. I haven't read many detective
Rather than surrender to the chick-lit label, my fallback approach is to analogize. "Remember Erich Segal's Love Story? It's
Calling critics sexist for disliking a book doesn't fix the problem of gender inequity in literature.
We live in a world where success is considered to be directly correlated to the amount of commas in a person's bank account, and to some degree, success and monetary returns are tangentially related.
At the end of the day, writers can't worry about what readers think, want or buy. We have one job, and one job only: to follow our passions and put words on the page, creating books that we, ourselves, feel proud to have written.
Internationally acclaimed, their books have been translated into dozens of languages, and are regularly on best-seller lists. Peter and Ian are being interviewed together since they collaborated on a story in Face Off, a collection of short stories by some of the world's greatest thriller writers.
Why is it bad things happening to good people makes for such compelling, dare I say, pleasurable reading? There is a universal appeal to peeking into the miserable lives of others that has nothing to do with schadenfreude in its purest definition.
Is my novel a mystery? Is it literary fiction? Yes, and yes. But it's still considered women's fiction in the marketplace.
In reality, neither of the two categories of writers necessarily deserve the distinction of being better writers. Different writers is a better word choice.
Why is it generally considered not only acceptable but even pleasurable to read about adultery and murder when society doesn't tolerate them in real life?
I'd heard all sorts of horror stories about writers giving away the bulk of their royalties to publishers that gobbled up profits in huge percentages. We indie authors keep most of our sales. Was I doing the right thing, saying yes to a publisher when I'd already done the tough work of going indie?
Every genre novel is a novel of suspense. The literary novelist desires the reader to ask, "What does it mean?" The genre novelist wishes more than anything to hear the reader ask, "And then what happened?"
Will 21st century authors produce any classics? As the number of books of fiction produced each year approaches staggering numbers, classics bookshelves must find themselves frustrated in their search for the needle in the proverbial haystack.
There is no denying it: Hurricane Sandy is one of the biggest disasters that we as Americans have ever had to face. This past week, I've watched as friends, family, and fellow residents of the Tri-State area lost their lights, their homes, and even their lives.
The book business has become a competing stew of infinite taste sensations that are offered up increasingly sliced and diced, and composed for an increasing segmented reading public.