George Gershwin

Our nation can move forward, backward or sideways. The American songbook reflects, channels and sometimes redirects the nature of that movement.
The rhythm was absolutely fascinating at the Rose Theater over this past weekend as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra
And the performance deserved the standing ovation and the cheers. It would be hard to imagine a better performance by its astounding cast, the brilliant Mahler Chamber Orchestra, and its conductor, Alan Gilbert. The direction of Katie Mitchell and the design work of Vicki Mortimer and Jon Clark were all serving the same dramatic master--the story.
In my little town I've seen acclaimed opera productions, Tony-winning plays, great local musicians, singers and actors -- all in a beautifully restored 1936 movie theater, the single best cultural space in Marin, as far as I'm concerned.
Jeffrey Biegel is one of the busiest and most versatile pianists around. A Steinway Artist, he is both fiery champion of the classical repertoire and top pick among today's classical composers to debut their work.
The Philadelphia Orchestra concluded their regular season in Philly, with what proved to be a triumphal sold out performances of Leonard Bernstein's Mass, a pet project of musical director Yannick Nezet Seguin.
These wildly over-existential ponderings were triggered by, of all things, the recently opened, widely celebrated, extravagantly beautiful, production of An American in Paris, which, as so many have been saying, really is great to look at.
The revamped An American in Paris, the Broadway musical at the Palace, is sui generis. There is no other musical on The Great White Way to equal it. The dance-driven production, ending with a stunning, 14-minute ballet that closes the show, is a triumph.
Don't get me wrong, there's no problem with being a sex worker, or a wife, or a ballerina, or a heiress if you so choose. But what the female protagonists and antagonists in Gigi and An American in Paris lack is agency in their happily ever afters.