george tenet

Think about this the next time you hear the GOP talk about freedom.
Last Wednesday, July 6th, was George W. Bush's 70th birthday and should have been an occasion for celebration. He got a present that he probably would rather not have received, however -- the long-awaited report on the British role in the invasion of Iraq.
tatistician Nate Silver of Five Thirty Eight and The New York Times created a composite list in January 2013 of previous presidential rankings by scholars. This is as definitive a ranking as we have at this time.
We should not equate post-tragedy toughness with perfect leadership. It's time we started asking questions like: How did this happen?
I'm going to keep this really simple. In response to your comment that you could personally "plead guilty" to not having imagined terrorists would use passenger aircraft as weapons→please stop lying.
Wikileaks' dump of Brennan's emails didn't reveal any state secrets, but it did put observers in an odd position.
The war in Afghanistan is now in its fifteenth year, making it the longest war in our history. By turning from fighting the terrorists in Afghanistan who attacked us, to Iraq, which had not, President George W. Bush did not "keep us safe.
"We were fully transparent and deceived no one."
Tenet has previously said that he developed a plan to go after al Qaeda in 1999, and worked to increase U.S. intelligence
Since the day President Obama took office, he has failed to bring to justice anyone responsible for the torture of terrorism
When the president takes the country to war...
A 2009 Senate Armed Services Committee report found that the abuses at Abu Ghraib were not the result of a few unmonitored
Ten years ago today the U.S. invaded Iraq with the goals of toppling Saddam Hussein, destroying its weapons of mass destruction (WMDs), and freeing its people. Now, a decade later, Hussein is dead, but no WMDs were ever found, and the country has devolved into a de facto civil war.
"The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting." It's one of Milan Kundera's most famous lines, from his novel The Book of Laughter and Forgetting. It's one worth keeping in mind as we approach March 20, the 10th anniversary of one of the biggest disasters in the history of the United States. That was the day George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, and a team of others -- along with much of Washington and a very complicit mainstream media -- took the nation to war against Iraq. The devastating consequences of that war will continue for decades, but a full accounting has still yet to happen. Allowing the toxic mixture of lies, deception and rationalizations that led to that war to go unchallenged makes it more likely that we will make similar tragic mistakes in the future. So I hope we can use this moment to assess what really happened, to look back in order to look forward.
The fate of Susan Rice is, of course, in your hands. But allow me to offer my encouragement to remain deliberate in selecting her as the next Secretary of State. Do not buckle to the absurdities of Washington gossip.
The day will surely come when some future president awards the Medal of Freedom to George W. Bush. It will happen. But why on earth would an ex-president need the same medal that Richard Petty got?
The black comedy of the Iraqi defector codenamed "Curveball" that has just resurfaced tells us much about how the U.S. has made such a mess in the Mideast.
The following letter, by a former US intelligence officer, was sent in response to Thomas Powers's review of Robert Jervis's