geothermal

Lava from the Kilauea volcano is dangerously close to a major geothermal power plant in Hawaii.
The Norris Geyser Basin is the hottest and most actively changing geothermal hot spring in the area, and its intensely colored
Legislators say Koch-affiliated groups pressured Republicans on the issue.
If you're a homeowner considering options in solar, wind, geothermal or other renewable energy technology, here are a few questions to address before making a decision:
How do we know we don't really need this oil? Because the oil companies are lobbying like hell to be allowed to export it. In their unpatriotic multinational way, they are willing to risk America the beautiful and our health for more zeroes on their ledgers. What alternatives do we have?
If you're familiar with geothermal energy, you know most existing geothermal projects rely on high-temperature permeable rock relatively near the surface that has its own naturally occurring water supply.
These destinations, where the earth's crust breaks open with bubbling mud, gushing hot springs, and steamy vapors, are gorgeous places to exhale.
Toyota made a major announcement today: It will stop focusing on pure electric vehicles, and begin focusing its attention on hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. This is huge.
Let's not go through 30 or more years of crisis and disaster. Let's learn from the past, and from what others are doing around us. Let's all pull together and think on a bigger scale.
According to Hawai'i Rural Development Council surveys, food security is Hawai'i's number one priority. "Difficulties faced by local farmers" is number 3, and "GMO agriculture" is number 5.
Geothermal addresses all three of those points. It's inexpensive compared to using oil to produce our energy; we already know that it works; and after decades of experience with it here, the comparative risk is low.
Farmers and other Ag and business people on the Big Island are in disbelief - to put it mildly - that Mayor Kenoi signed Bill 113, the anti-GMO bill, last week, without first putting together a group to research the science and investigate the serious, unintended consequences we know will result.
What we're doing on the Big Island with Bill 113 is trying to make a law that prohibits us from helping ourselves. It is the exact opposite of what we should be doing.
How about Hawai'i's economy doubling in 24 years? That would result from a compound growth of just 3 percent. Would we need double the number of hotel rooms? But if the price of oil keeps rising, can we do that?
A recent bill up before the Hawai'i County Council would have criminalized Big Island farmers for using biotechnology to grow their crops with less fertilizer and fewer pesticides. A second bill is still on the table, and I almost cannot think of anything that would take us further away from where we need to be heading.
As planets age, they typically become cooler and darker, but astronomers have long wondered why Saturn, one of the largest
Climate change may not be popular, but people do want to hear about clean tech and green jobs. These are exciting, entrepreneurial
Many proponents of nuclear power are the same "let the market work" advocates in economics and politics today. If the market were allowed to function in this case, would any new nuclear power plants be built in America -- or existing ones re-licensed -- if Price-Anderson were repealed?
Give your appliances a break: Remember it's summer. Dry your clothes on a clothes line. Grill outside, and dine by candle light. And turn off your computers and entertainment equipment at night.