Getting Things Done

1. Tossing and catching a ball tethered to my wrist. 2. Blinking often and rapid blinking a few times a day. 3. Lifting eyebrows
In the past couple of weeks I was at a retreat (sans computer or iPhone) and then it was Christmas and my usual unrestricted
That afternoon I reached out to five people asking for support. But again I was assuming one of them would "rescue" me and
Determining the next action is the crux of completing. And before doing that next action, first there is this decision to make: is this my next action or can I delegate it to someone else? (It's is good to delegate whenever possible.)
Withheld and incomplete communications can pull more on our attention than not finishing an email inbox or completing a project. In my experience incomplete communications can seem subtle but as I describe in a recent experience of mine, not so subtle.
IN is the location of everything you haven't yet seen or you have seen it and you are procrastinating on a decision. It's a physical designation and not a place in your head.
Due to challenges with the placement of the cover of my new book, Tuck Me In, the printer decided to pull their contract. The email notifying me of this was easily something I could "react to." I was just about to begin one of my bi-weekly Hour of Focus calls and given the nature of the call I chose in the moment to reply to the email with a simple -- please reconsider.
You're working on a new project or putting together that important proposal. You're following up on your emails and trying to squeeze in lunch. And you've got to pick up your kids at daycare soon! You're busy, busy, busy. Too busy to get to everything. Except you're not.
People are always asking me what to keep and what to toss and how do you make that determination. I start by asking myself
4. And it goes without saying; continue practicing the essential actions - the weekly review, writing down and tracking your