gimme shelter

There will be volumes, written about Albert's contribution to the paradigm shift, which took place in American cinema, when he freed the camera from its tripod. When he and his brother David, courageously, told the extraordinary stories of ordinary people.
A word about documentary filmmaker Albert Maysles, who died last week. I didn't know him well, but well enough to call him Al. We had not seen one another very often in the past few years, yet decades ago, he played a crucial role in my transition to independence and adulthood.
I don't make movies like Al. I'm too busy working out my neurotic wounds to be a fly on the wall, but I adore his films. Who doesn't? They are smart, funny and like Al, very sensitive.
Albert and David Maysles are generally regarded as the fathers of the modern American documentary film. Beginning in the early 1960s, their pioneering work with contemporaries helped launch the 'Direct Cinema' movement.
Vanessa Hudgens is doing everything she can to strip off her squeaky-clean Disney image. For her latest role in "Gimme Shelter
Based on a true story, Gimme Shelter is one of those films that means well: It's earnest, filled with the spirit of forgiveness -- indeed, it wouldn't seem out of place on the Lifetime network.
If lofty intentions, determination and hard work were all it took to make a successful movie, then "Gimme Shelter," a film about teen pregnancy starring former Disney star Vanessa Hudgens, would have it made.
Laneya Wiles (pronounced la-NEE-ah) has her fingers -- sheesh, her toes, too, -- dipped in everything. Actor, comedian, director, writer, New Yorker -- you name it. With many projects about to be released and upcoming projects in development, you may want to create a Google alert for her.
Hudgens looked every bit the movie star in a black Giorgio Armani dress with a plunging neckline that rivaled some of the
"We made these artists sound incredible. They wanted that church sound. I always thought there was a spiritual thing we brought to the table. They were not going to get that anywhere else. We came smack dab out of the church and that's basically what we brought to a lot of artists we worked with. And they loved it."
It's hard to imagine another documentary this year that will be as uplifting, entertaining and moving as Morgan Neville's 20 Feet From Stardom.
Gimme Shelter is a Greek tragedy with a rock 'n' roll chorus and a triple injection of hubris. It was commissioned by the Rolling Stones to capture the last few stops of their infamous 1969 U.S. tour, which ended in the tragic free concert at Altamont Speedway where there were four deaths.
A social music company called Smule ran an insightful experiment. They put the 900 million songs in their database through rigorous analysis, correlating the musical tastes of users with "red" and "blue" states. The results were illuminating.
Last week James Franco wrote an anecdotal piece on his experience watching "Gimme Shelter," a film by the Maysles Brothers
What had started as a concert film about the Rolling Stones, a follow-up of sorts to the Maysles' The Beatles: The First U.S. Visit, turned into a Zapruder-like document that sounded the death knell for the flower power of the 1960s.
2007-11-16-jaggerwatchesaltamont_stabbingpull.jpgThe Rolling Stones and the Velvet Underground mix it up in a Chicago museum.