girl up

"I want to tell you I'm passionate about the 62 million girls," she said, who lack access to sufficient education, as a result of poverty or distance from school campuses. Furthermore, she encouraged the group of young activists to "start with whatever issue move [them]," and also to remain hopeful despite adversity and pessism they face on the path to change, which she said may lead them to feeling "heartbroken, angry, overwhelmed."
What kind of world do you want for your family in 2030? We asked celebrities, experts, and moms and dads around the world that question. Their collective answers moved us, excited us, and left us with hope and optimism for the future.
Presented by Johnson & Johnson
The Global Moms Relay is one of my favorite HuffPost traditions, a collaborative effort to tap into our collective gratitude and love, not only for our own mothers, but for all mothers around the world. This year's theme is "What kind of world do you want for your family in 2030?" And we're using the HuffPost platform to bring more and more voices into this conversation and harness the power of social media for good.
Girls are powerful. The passage of the Girls Count Act is an important reminder that when girls seek to empower one another, anything is possible!
Of all of the incredible work I get to do at Glamour -- the Women of the Year Awards, putting heroes like First Lady Michelle Obama on the cover -- this is the stuff that fires me up most. Why? Because this next generation of girls has really got something.
Girl Up's vision is that, all girls, no matter their geographical location, have the opportunity to become educated, healthy, safe, counted, and positioned to be the next generation of leaders.
You might not be able to bring back the girls kidnapped in Nigeria with your support now, but you can ensure that the world takes preventive steps to ensure that women and girls are protected, empowered, and educated -- fearlessly -- around the world.
Sunday is Mother's Day, and there's no better time to join the movement to improve the health and well-being of mothers and babies everywhere. That's the goal of the Global Moms Relay. In partnership with the UN Foundation, Johnson & Johnson and BabyCenter, HuffPost is putting the spotlight on the ways we can bring new opportunities to women and children around the world.
Watching my mother and grandmother taught me so much -- seeing them nurture people and animals showed me, through their actions, what mattered most. They made so many sacrifices for our family, and they set the standard. They inspired me from childhood to volunteer and advocate for those less fortunate.
Girl Up is dedicated to improving the lives of girls around the world and empowering them to give their hearts to make this world a better place. We asked our Teen Advisors about their mothers.. and then filmed the answers with their mothers watching.
It is embedded in the fabric of so many mothers to instill this idea that anything is possible for their children, by being willing to do everything they can to get those kids on the right path.
Mom power is as unique in every community as it is universal. And it's essential to solving global problems like reducing the number of women who die from childbirth complications and ending the millions of preventable child deaths.
March 8th marks International Women's Day, a time to celebrate the tremendous gains that women have achieved. But it's also a day to acknowledge how much still needs to be done. Here are some startling facts.
What if you didn't know when your birthday was? What if your government didn't know you existed? What if you weren't counted at all? Counting means a lot of things but mostly "I count" means "I matter."
One of most gorgeous women on the planet, Priyanka Chopra, for the longest time, aspired to become either a criminal psychologist, or a software engineer. The other day, I sat down with her, and talked to her about Lady Gaga, UNICEF, Solar Power, and Rape.
Every year, approximately 51 million children under the age of five are not registered at birth, a disproportionate number of whom are girls. The Girls Count Act is a statement that the United States will proactively support every child's right to receive legal and social benefits through registration at birth.
Riya Singh is a girl leader based in San Francisco who is committed to supporting girls' leadership around the world. Riya has worked as a teen advisor for GirlUp, where she raises funds and support for girls in developing countries.
As leaders in Russia and around the world turn increasing attention to establishing the post-2015 development agenda, let's raise our voices to make sure that safety, equality, and empowerment for girls and women are at the top of that agenda.
Girl Up is a for-girls, by-girls organization of the United Nations Foundation that engages teens in the United States to