girls empowerment

Since 2006, the stories of good news from the ground in Uganda have been extraordinary. For the past 10 years, Just Like
Layla* is one of them. Her family's home had been destroyed, and her mother could no longer afford to keep her fed or safe
We knew immediately that this visit would be beneficial for us because we noticed that the staff of Rafiki not only spoke about sustainability, they fully incorporated it as the basis of all their work.
By then Kamala had taken stock of the most pressing needs of the villagers. She had helped individual families and had started
In looking toward the future of health of societies around the globe, so much is needed if we are to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Securing the health and rights of girls and women is a necessary condition if we are to succeed.
LitWorld focuses two-thirds of its work on empowering women and girls with transformational literacy because two-thirds of the world's illiterate people are women and girls. And illiteracy equals profound vulnerability.
We've reached a new age. Tech innovators throughout Asia and Africa are now developing applications that address local climate change adaptation, health awareness and agricultural solutions.
The charge to educate girls is amplifying. Girls Inc. is proud to partner with The White House's Let Girls Learn initiative to help adolescent girls around the globe complete their education.
We at Women SPEAK are starting a revolution to shift our understanding of how women have changed and are changing the world. This revolution will not be televised.
This past weekend, 40 aspiring teen leaders gathered for a weekend of inspiration to challenge the status quo, live confidently and change the world. It's a big undertaking, so we sought the advice, insight and stories of incredible female role models.
"The Pollination Project Seed Grant was the first grant we received, and was the first glimpse we had into believing our
We loved our students. They worked hard; they were motivated; they found such joy in learning. But the odds were stacked against them.
"Give me your definition of what it means to be a girl?" That is the question photographer Kate Parker asked 13-year-old Callen Swiegart between her football game and cotillion class.
I served as a community health volunteer in Swaziland from 2012 to 2014, finishing in August. I had my share of long, dull days, and I had a few extremely busy ones. But much of my time went to a girls-empowerment program.
Recently, I was amazed to receive an invitation from a 13 year old boy to speak at his fundraiser. This brilliant young boy, Max Byrant, decided to organize a local event in his community to raise awareness on Girls Education globally.
We've seen what is most difficult to measure and most fundamental to change: the power a girl holds within herself. That power burns bright in amazingly brave girls as they challenge convention and open whole new horizons of change.
As a millennial, I worry that the hashtag is becoming not only the preferred form of social protest, but the only form of social activism and social justice of our generation.
Being called bossy is no fun. And I'm all for people not using the word "bossy" as negative shorthand for girls trying to flex their burgeoning leadership skills. But as one friend mentioned to me, maybe a better approach is teaching our girls to "stand up," rather than making them believe we can change the behavior of others.