girls rights

Since 2006, the stories of good news from the ground in Uganda have been extraordinary. For the past 10 years, Just Like
On this International Day of the Girl we celebrate women and girls all over the world and work towards how we as women can set a better example of leadership.
Friday was International Day of the Girl Child, established in 2012 to honor and observe the rights of girls everywhere, who represent the hope and future of their families, communities and nations, yet face countless rights violations such as violence and harassment, female genital mutilation and child marriage, which claims 15 million girls each year in the developing world.
International Day of the Girl is celebrated on 11 October each year. Around the world NGOs, civil society groups, UN agencies
Prostitution, one of the most brutal forms of male-perpetrated sexual abuse, is illegal in South Africa. While corrupt police are known to arrest and brutalize the women for loitering, buyers of sexual acts are rarely arrested.
This year, one billion children around the world will experience a form of violence and around 200 million children will
There's no better time to raise our voices for the rights of women and girls in the United States than now. That is why we are elated to join thousands of other women and girls' advocates at the historic United State of Women Summit on June 14.
Our culture's current lack of understanding of women as full human beings must evolve into a conviction that indivisible rights include freedom from unfettered male sexual access, from female genital mutilation to child marriage; from reproductive health to sexual violence; from sexual harassment to prostitution. Achieving equality depends on it.
Reforestation is one of the primary weapons we have against climate change and -- crucially -- against ever-expanding desertification, a scourge that affects two thirds of the world's countries and about one billion people.
This is why our organization, Rise Up, brought a delegation of girls from Liberia and the US South to share their powerful
On Saturday 6th February, the world will mark the International Day for Zero Tolerance to Female Genital Mutilation (FGM).
As we celebrate Human Rights Day, the anniversary of the signing of the declaration, we face the hard truth that we are falling far short of protecting human rights around the world. In no area is this clearer than the failure to protect far too many young girls.
Girls are powerful. The passage of the Girls Count Act is an important reminder that when girls seek to empower one another, anything is possible!
Of all of the incredible work I get to do at Glamour -- the Women of the Year Awards, putting heroes like First Lady Michelle Obama on the cover -- this is the stuff that fires me up most. Why? Because this next generation of girls has really got something.
You ask any father, anywhere, from any religion, any culture, and they'll speak as if they love their daughters more than anything -- girls hold a special place in their fathers' hearts. Yet in all cultures, that changes when it comes to positions of power, and family, and role in society.
Today, as Africa simultaneously commemorates the Day of the African Child and the 25th anniversary of the Charter, we have a rare opportunity to reflect on both progress and challenges in responding to child marriages in Africa.
The world must take action where governments and communities have failed our girls. They deserve to live and not to die in childbirth. They deserve to thrive and live healthy lives. Above all, we must protect these girls so that they live a life free of violence, abuse and stigma and can raise healthy children.
April 15th marks one year ago that Boko Haram brutally abducted 276 schoolgirls in Nigeria, as they studied for their spring exams. Our girls who have not been brought back, who are now simply disappeared, cannot be lost to us.