Giuseppe Verdi

It had been a long time since Jackie and I were in the Emilia Romagna region of northern Italy: In 2001 we saw operas, ate
Senator Cruz, it was frightening for a conductor to see what happened in your misjudged pregnant pauses. What works from the pulpit and the orchestra pit does not always work on the stump.
New breakthroughs in technology have a long history of disrupting the status quo. When I first learned how to type, it was on a manual typewriter that, if you hit the carriage return handle hard enough, might fall off the desk.
As a musician, or as an Artist, as I prefer to think of myself, I often feel there is way too much pressure on us creatives to be this undefinable super-being for the world.
This past weekend at Disney Hall, an inspired Los Angeles Master Chorale and Orchestra, conducted by Artistic Director Grant Gershon, gave two thrilling, ultimately cathartic performances of Giuseppe Verdi's Requiem.
Two well-established musical masterpieces returned to Bay area stages last fall in exceptional productions which proved, beyond any shadow of a doubt, the strength and vitality of each work's score and libretto. The fact that they were so beautifully performed only added to the audience's sense of artistic fulfillment.
How to spur your creativity? By listening to some Rigoletto and La Traviata music from the Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi.
We're in for a wild ride the next few years. Some really great operas are going to be produced. The Great Dream is coming true.
In a city where culture is rather nascent and there is no rich history of the arts, it's exciting to see parents educating their teens to appreciate the nuances of Verdi's masterpiece.
Today, Egypt is troubled. As my country becomes more politically polarized, sectarian violence continues to rock its society.