give and take

It was the marketing tagline for a popular 1980s negotiating skills program. Personally, I find this concept absolutely exhausting. Do you really want to game every aspect of daily life?
Most leaders are aware of the link between employee engagement and business results. We've seen studies like Aon Hewitt's 2013 Trends in Global Employee Engagement, which showed that a 5% increase in engagement is linked to a 3% increase in revenues.
It's been a long time since I thought of give and take as an equation and balance. Just yesterday, I was reminded of how you can be taken advantage of when you are a "giver."
One week ago, Adam Grant was the featured speaker for H'University, a social impact initiative by Harry's where University students are able to hear from different influencers from different industries and backgrounds.
In the past year and a half, I've given over 100 keynote speeches and hundreds of presentations, and things have changed dramatically. I still get nervous occasionally, but public speaking is now one of my favorite activities. Here are the five steps that have been most helpful in reducing my anxiety.
Adam Grant is the youngest tenured and highest-rated professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. He joins us to discuss his work and a new recipe for success.
I highly admired them for the infinite efforts they put into "giving," and especially, into mentoring students and professionals.
Adam Grant is a Wharton Business School Professor who sounds just like my mother: They both tell me it is better to give than to receive. The only difference is that Adam wrote a New York Times bestseller, Give and Take, to make his point.
Infographic by Jan Diehm for the Huffington Post Too often, though, we equate giving only with money. And of course, donating
Camp Kesem is a cause that's close to Viner's heart. To help kids who are going through the same thing that he did, he's
When people think you're trying to influence them, they put their guard up. But when they feel you're trying to help them, or to muse your way to the right answer, or to be honest about your own imperfections, they open up to you. They hear what you have to say.
The Torah reminds us that while we might think we acquire property, such as Land, let's not kid ourselves. Ultimately, it belongs to God. During our lifetimes, we are given a sacred trust to safeguard the Land so that future generations may enjoy it as well.
If you've felt betrayed by someone who often asks for favors, yet rarely reciprocates, you are not alone. What makes some givers successful and sought-after is that they have both a deep, evident caring for others, yet they also attend to their own self-interest.
Spouses and families contribute to an individual's professional success, no doubt. But how should they be acknowledged?
Some of our biggest inside battles involve changing habits to create a more meaningful, congenial life with others. Try six research-based tips for turning the page to the next chapter of the adventure story we are truly meant to live.
Balance in a relationship means not only that you need to give wisely, but also that you may need to look around to see how you're also receiving more than you might notice.
Best, Irene I've had the same best friend for more than 20 years. We were so close that we even have matching tattoos. We
Economists have an analysis technique to identify and compare all expenditure and benefits of a given project; cost/benefit analysis. There's a similar energetic rule for interpersonal associations.