glass-steagall act

“So this is how liberty dies... with thunderous applause.”
2016 will be different. First, more voters will be coming to the polls because of the Presidential election. Second, they will be better educated because there is now a blacklist of the most heinous vote-against-the-public, vote-for-the-funders offenders.
"We won't see a presidential candidate like Bernie again in our lifetimes." As I heard these words, spoken by a woman at a Sanders campaign event recently, I felt a chill go through me. Because I knew she was right. We won't.
Bush's remarks in New Hampshire may make him more progressive on the issue than Hillary Clinton.
The traditional practice of opening savings accounts, reviewing loans, and providing other customer services has largely been supplanted by high-risk gambling and the aggressive hustling of dubious investments to unwary clients.
Hillary and her #WallStreetDemocrats apparently believe that it is okay to continue to have financial institutions that are Too Big To Fail. Her plan is to always have enough complex rules and regulations in place to control their increasingly complex investment schemes.  
We probably already know how the Republican and Democratic candidates will answer these questions, but it is always good to get their views on the record and let the public see where they stand. This is particularly important because, according the public opinion polls, Americans overwhelmingly support affirmative answers to these questions.
Until the political importance of Glass-Steagall is recognized, financial reform is doomed. Captured regulators will implement milquetoast versions of reform laws, and Congress will entertain amendments to slowly repeal the reforms.
Democracy in America is on life support. If we don't soon rally en masse to its defense, corporate interests will pull the plug. Sanders is the only candidate to fully realize what's at stake, to tell the truth, and to articulate what WE, the People, must do.
No one needs to remind us of the cataclysmic U.S. economic crisis and resulting great recession beginning in 2008, primarily caused by excessive speculation in housing mortgage financing and the leveraging of exotic financial instruments.